Law and Society Program

Undergraduate Program

Overview


Many disciplines and departments in the College of Arts and Science provide important perspectives on law and the legal system. The Law and Society minor offers undergraduates a useful and meaningful cluster of courses in this area. Administered through the Department of Sociology, the minor is interdisciplinary in nature. It consists of five courses: two required “core” courses (Law and Society, Research Methods) and three electives. The electives can be taken from a list of approved courses across a range of disciplines. This allows the minor to be both substantial and coherent in its focus. The minor also provides students the opportunity to pursue advanced and specialized work through independent study projects as well as access to graduate classes (with permission of faculty). While prelaw students are welcome to take these classes, the minor is not aimed specifically at them.

A list of courses that count toward the Law and Society minor is available every semester through the Sociology Department. Contact Jamie Lloyd ( jamie.lloyd@nyu.edu) or Professor Lynne Haney ( lynne.haney@nyu.edu) for a copy of this list or with questions about the minor.

To declare a Law & Society minor complete the Declaration of Minor Form.This form should be mailed or dropped off to Jamie Lloyd at the NYU Department of Sociology, Puck Building, 295 Lafayette Street, room 4168.

Requirements for the Minor


The minor in Law and Society consists of five 4-point courses (20 points). The requirements are as follows:

One core course, chosen from:
Law and Society (LWSOC-UA 1 001), cross-listed with Politics (POL-UA 335)
Law and Society (LWSOC-UA 1 002), cross-listed with Sociology (SOC-UA 413

One course in Research Methods (SOC-UA 301 or another methods course with approval of Law and Society director)

Three elective courses. Students can also petition the Director to have additional courses count toward the elective requirement.

Note: Courses applied to this minor cannot be double-counted toward a major or another minor.
The pass/fail option is not acceptable for the law and society minor.

Students who declared a minor in Law and Society prior to Fall 2013 are not required to take Research Methods; they may take a fourth elective instead.

Students who are majoring in Sociology, and who are taking Research Methods to fulfill their major requirement, can take a fourth elective instead.

Independent Study


Independent Study is an opportunity for students to work closely with a faculty advisor on a project related to their area of study. Students must choose a member of the faculty. After securing written approval from a faculty member, the student should contact the Undergraduate Administrator, in order to register for the independent study course. The proposal will be reviewed by the program Director for approval. It is imperative that students meet with their faculty advisor on a regular basis throughout the semester in which they are doing the independent study. Upon completion of the "course", written proof from the student's faculty advisor that the student has completed all course work for study and a grade must be sent to the Undergraduate Administrator. Independent Study counts towards the Law & Society Minor and can substitute for one of the non-core Law & Society courses. A grade of at least C is required in every course to be counted towards the Law & Society Minor.

On the written proposal you must list the following:

•  Topic of the course
•  How many credits (1-4 credits - at the discretion of the faculty member )
•  Books you will be reading
•  Name of the faculty member (must be a CAS faculty member)

FAQ: Questions about the Law & Society minor

Is a pass/fail option acceptable for courses in the Law & Society minor?
No

Does Law & Society allow you to double count toward a major or toward another minor?
No

Must you take the core course Law & Society (V62.0001) before any of the elective courses?
No, but we recommend that you take it as soon as possible and do not wait until your senior year.

Where can I request the "Declaration of Minor" form?
You can click on the "Declaration of Minor" form above or here: Declaration of Minor.

Where do I drop off the "Declaration of Minor" form?
You have the option of mailing or dropping off the form to Jamie Lloyd, 295 Lafayette Street, room 4168, New York, NY 10012.

What is an Independent Study course and what are the requirements?
Independent Study is an opportunity for students to work closely with a faculty advisor on a project related to their area of study. Students must choose a member of the faculty. After securing approval from a faculty member in writing, the student should contact the Undergraduate Administrator, in order to register for the independent study course. The proposal will be reviewed by the program Director for approval. It is imperative that students meet with their faculty advisor on a regular basis throughout the semester in which they are doing the independent study. Upon completion of the "course", written proof from the student's faculty advisor that the student has completed all course work for study and a grade must be presented to the Undergraduate Administrator. Independent Study counts towards the Law & Society Minor and can substitute for one of the non-core Law & Society courses. A grade of at least C is required in every course to be counted towards the Law & Society Minor.

On the written proposal you must list the following:

  • Topic of the course
  • How many credits (1-4 credits - at the discretion of the professor)
  • Books you will be reading
  • Name of the faculty member (must be a CAS faculty member)

Can I count courses taken at other universities towards my Law & Society minor?
Only with the permission of the Law & Society Program. You must submit a syllabus or a detailed course description for consideration.

Can I count courses taken abroad towards my Law & Society minor?
Only relevant Law & Society courses that are approved by the Law & Society program. You must submit a syllabus or a detailed course description for consideration