Summer Institutes

2017 Summer Institute

Identity, COLONIALISM, NATIONALISMS & ISLAMISMS in THE MIDDLE EAST 

Step 1: Please complete this registration form.  

Step 2:  Please pay the $50 registration fee (plus processing fee) via this Eventbrite link.

The registration fee covers course materials, including books, as well as coffee refreshments and lunch provided on all five days. Please note that this Summer Institute is geared primarily towards middle school and high school social studies teachers.

This Summer Institute for k12 educators will focus on the themes of identity, colonialism, nationalisms, and Islam in the Middle East. We will be introduced to the modern history and political thought behind various strands of nationalisms and Islamisms starting from the demise of the Ottoman Empire up to the present day. The Institute will explore these themes from many angles, including through art, music, poetry, and cinema, diaries and autobiographical accounts. By doing so, this Summer Institute will suggest that imperialism, colonialism, nationalism and Islamism look differently depending upon the angle from which they are viewed and the ways they are framed. 

This Summer Institute is offered for 30 Continuing Teacher and Leader Education (CTLE) Hours approved by New York State Education Department

Peter C. Valenti has been teaching in the field of Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies since 1999, over ten of those years here at NYU, including graduate courses on how to teach the Middle East in high school for the Social Studies Education program in NYU Steinhardt. He has specialized in the socioeconomic and political history of Saudi Arabia and the Persian Gulf, as well as pursuing research in state-building in Iraq, Islamist movements, and Islamic and Arabic literature. As part of his professional career he has lived and conducted research in a variety of countries throughout the Middle East, including Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey.  In addition to his academic work, Valenti has worked in a variety of editorial and media positions, contributing to the New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, NPR and World Press Review.

For any questions regarding this Summer Institute, please contact diana.shin@nyu.edu.

In this intensive and interactive course, participants will examine the historical and contemporary relationship between the United States and the Middle East with a particular focus on the period since 1945. The course will focus on the political, historical, and cultural encounters between the Middle East and the United States, cover an array of topics, and also familiarize participants with teaching tools, such as graphic novels, political cartoons, and films, as well as pedagogical methods, such as role play to help engage students in gaining insights into complex negotiations and political situations. In addition to a broad range of lecture topics from top experts, this course will also incorporate several film screenings as well as curriculum workshops, in which participants are introduced to teaching tools appropriate for classroom use.

This course’s objective is to inspire educators to teach about U.S. - Middle East relations within social studies curriculum with a critical understanding that goes beyond commonly held assumptions and media headlines. At the end of the 5-day course, participants will have a basic historical knowledge of some of the major events in U.S.-Middle East relations over the past 70 years as well as have gained teaching tools to incorporate this content knowledge for classroom teaching.

 

This Summer Institute was offered for as a  '3P-credits" through the New York City's Department of Education's  After School Professional Development Program (ASPDP).

Peter C. Valenti has been teaching in the field of Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies since 1999, over ten of those years here at NYU, including graduate courses on how to teach the Middle East in high school for the Social Studies Education program in NYU Steinhardt. He has specialized in the socioeconomic and political history of Saudi Arabia and the Persian Gulf, as well as pursuing research in state-building in Iraq, Islamist movements, and Islamic and Arabic literature. As part of his professional career he has lived and conducted research in a variety of countries throughout the Middle East, including Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey.  In addition to his academic work, Valenti has worked in a variety of editorial and media positions, contributing to the New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, NPR and World Press Review.

In this intensive and interactive three-day workshop, participants will explore the complexity and diversity of daily life among Muslims in the Americas (the U.S., the Caribbean, and Latin America). We will probe key presumptions about Muslims and challenge conventional view of Islam that approach it in terms of a fixed cast of characters whose practices tell a predetermined story. Instead, we will focus on cross-cultural comparisons of Muslims as they craft Islam in the "New World" of the Americas, where Muslims make their presence felt in both direct and oblique ways, which involves interpretations that vary with particular relations of power, historical moment, and social formation. Educators will be encouraged to create innovative curricula that will challenge students to think critically about such issues as the relationship between "traditional" and "modern," the meaning of citizenship and belonging, and the experience of immigrants and migration. The workshop's objectives are to inspire educators to teach about they ways that "difference" and ideas about the "other" impact the everyday lives of peoples of the Americas, and to point to possible new ways to teach about tolerance and justice.

Aisha Khan is Associate Professor of Anthropology at New York University. She is the author of Callaloo Nation: Metaphors of Race and Religious Identity among South Asians in Trinidad (2004, Duke University Press) and the editor of Islam and the Americas (2015, University of Florida Press). Her areas of expertise include the Caribbeans, Latin America, race and ethnicity, religion, theory and method in diaspora studies.

The Kevorkian Center's Summer Institutes for k12 educators are supported in part by a Title VI grant by the Department of Education.