Majoring in Italian Studies

The major in Italian Studies consists of nine 4-point courses (36 points):

    •   Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30)
    •  One conversation course: Conversations in Italian (ITAL-UA 101); Italian Through Cinema (ITAL-UA 107); or Italian Through Opera (ITAL-UA 108)
    •  One composition course: Creative Writing in Italian (ITAL-UA 103); Advanced Composition (ITAL-UA     105); or Translation (ITAL-UA 110)
    •  One Literature Survey course: Readings in Medieval and Renaissance Literature (ITAL-UA 115) or Readings in Modern Literature (ITAL-UA 116)
    •  Five Culture and Society or Advanced Literature courses, distributed among the following areas: (1) Medieval/Early Modern Studies and (2) Modern/ Contemporary Studies

For a major requirements checklist, click here.

Transfer students must complete at least five courses (20 points) of the nine courses (36 points) required for the Italian major while in residence at New York University.

Before beginning courses toward the major in Italian Studies, students must gain satisfactory knowledge of Italian by:

1. Completing the introductory language sequence up to Intermediate Italian II (ITAL-UA 12) or Intensive Intermediate Italian (ITAL-UA 20); or
2. Obtaining a score of 650 or above on the NYU placement test; or
3. Obtaining a score of 650 or above on the SAT II.

Students who have taken introductory Italian courses in high school or at other Universities are required to take the NYU placement test before registering for Italian language courses at NYU.

Students with no prior background in Italian wishing to complete a major are strongly encouraged to register for the intensive sequence in order to be able to complete the major in a timely fashion. All prospective majors should consult with an adviser prior to registration.

INTRODUCTORY LANGUAGE COURSES:
Extensive Sequence
Elementary Italian I (ITAL-UA 1) – For students with no prior knowledge of Italian.
Elementary Italian II (ITAL-UA 2) – Prerequisite: ITAL-UA 1, or assignment by placement test.
Intermediate Italian I (ITAL-UA 11) – Prerequisite: ITAL-UA 2, ITAL-UA 10, or assignment by placement test.
Intermediate Italian II (ITAL-UA 12) – Prerequisite: ITAL-UA 11, or assignment by placement test.

Intensive Sequence
Intensive courses are fast-paced and give students the opportunity to complete the introductory sequence in two semesters rather than four. They are 6-credit courses and meet every day from Monday to Friday. The Intensive Sequence is highly recommended for those wishing to major in Italian, and for students that have a facility with foreign languages.
Intensive Elementary Italian (ITAL-UA 10) – For students with no prior knowledge of Italian.
Intensive Intermediate Italian (ITAL-UA 20) – Prerequisite: ITAL-UA 2, ITAL-UA 10, or assignment by placement test.


ADVANCED LANGUAGE COURSES:

Students majoring in Italian must complete three advanced language courses: (1) Advanced Review of Modern Italian; (2) one conversation course; and (3) one composition course.

Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) – Prerequisite: ITAL-UA 12 or ITAL-UA 20. This course is a prerequisite for other advanced courses, in language, literature, and culture & society that are taught in Italian. Systemizes and reinforces the language skills presented in earlier-level courses through an intensive review of grammar and composition, lexical enrichment, improvement of speaking ability, and selected readings from contemporary Italian literature.

ITAL-UA 30 is a prerequisite for all of the following courses:
Conversations in Italian (ITAL-UA 101) – Develops ability to speak contemporary Italian through discussions, oral reports, and readings.
Creative Writing Italian (ITAL-UA 103) – Develops writing techniques through a creative approach to writing that encourages students to rewrite, parody, shift genres.
Advanced Composition (ITAL-UA 105) – Improves student written Italian and comprehension of difficult texts.
Italian Through Cinema (ITAL-UA 107) – Conversation class organized around the theme of cinema. Students view movie excerpts and discuss them.
Italian Through Opera (ITAL-UA 108) – Conversation class organized around the theme of opera.
Translation (ITAL-UA 110) – This course introduces students to the theory and practice of translation.


LITERATURE SURVEY COURSES:

Students majoring in Italian must complete one literature survey course, although they are encouraged to take both:
Medieval and Renaissance Literature (ITAL-UA 115) – Prerequisite: Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30). Course conducted in Italian.
Modern Italian Literature (ITAL-UA 116) – Prerequisite: Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30). Course conducted in Italian.


CONTENT COURSES:

Content courses are those classes that focus on Italian culture or society rather than language. They may be taught in either English or Italian. Students majoring in Italian are required to take five content (and/or advanced literature) courses distributed among the following areas: Medieval/Early Modern Studies and Modern/Contemporary Studies. Students are strongly encouraged to take at least one course in both of these subject areas.

We encourage all majors to take a sixth content or advanced literature course, if their schedule allows, in order to achieve a more well-rounded Italian education. No more than two courses from CORE-UA and/or FRSEM-UA, taught by an Italian Studies faculty member, may be counted toward the major.


STUDY ABROAD:

All majors are strongly encouraged to study for at least one semester at the NYU Florence campus, with necessary exceptions made for curricular, medical, familial, or athletic conflicts. Study in Italy further enriches the work that majors undertake in New York, brings the language alive in real time, and allows majors to use their linguistic skills to unlock an entire culture.

Boasting 57-acre grounds marked by five villas, modern facilities, and extensive gardens, the Villa La Pietra/NYU Florence campus comprises one of the most stunning study-abroad centers anywhere. La Pietra’s intimate setting and small classes provide a stimulating counterpart to study in New York, as well as afford numerous opportunities of direct learning from museum collections and other local institutions. Located in the center of Italy, Florence also provides an ideal point of departure for exploring the peninsula and its unparalleled archaeological, architectural, and art historical treasures, just an hour and half from Rome and less than three hours to Venice.


HONORS IN ITALIAN STUDIES:

Departmental honors will be awarded to majors who maintain an overall grade point average of 3.65 or above, maintain a grade point average of 3.65 or above in the major, and successfully complete the Honors program. This includes a Senior Honors Seminar in the Fall semester of their senior year.


CAPSTONE FOR NON-HONORS THESIS MAJORS:

Developed in conjunction with a faculty member in the junior or senior year, the capstone consists of a research paper or research project, as well as a final oral defense/discussion of the project in Italian. The capstone does not require a separate course or independent study, but rather is developed within a class in which the student is already enrolled. The student and professor develop a feasible project that is completed in addition to the existing course requirements. The department’s Spring Undergraduate Research Conference offers an ideal venue for the presentation of outstanding capstone projects.

**Please contact Melissa Alexander to schedule an Advising Appointment at ma4542@nyu.edu or call the Department at 212-998-8122. 

 

In addition, if you are finished with your major requirements, please email us so we can submit a memo of completion on your behalf.