Undergraduate Course Offerings

08 Studenti Casa Italiana _MG_7882b


Fulfillment of the College Core Curriculum Language Requirement
The language requirement in Italian may be fulfilled either by two 6-point intensive courses (ITAL-UA 10 and ITAL-UA 20) for a total of 12 points, or by the extensive sequence of four 4-point courses (ITALUA 1, ITAL-UA 2, ITAL-UA 11, and ITAL-UA 12) for a total of 16 points. A student may also follow a plan of study combining two 4-point courses with one 6-point course (ITAL-UA 1, ITAL-UA 2, and ITAL-UA 20; or ITAL-UA 10, ITAL-UA 11, and ITAL-UA 12) for a total of 14 points. All students planning to study in Florence or continue their study of Italian beyond the Core requirements are strongly advised to take ITAL-UA 10 and ITAL-UA 20, since this permits completion of the Core language requirement in two semesters.
Introductory Language Courses
Elementary Italian (
ITAL-UA 1) Open to students with no previous training in Italian and to others on assignment by placement test. Not equivalent to Intensive Elementary Italian (ITAL-UA 10). Only by combining ITAL-UA 1 with ITAL-UA 2 can a student complete the equivalent of ITAL-UA 10 and then continue on to the intermediate level. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Elementary Italian II
 (ITAL-UA 2) Prerequisite: Elementary Italian I (ITAL-UA 1) or assignment by placement test. To continue on to the intermediate level, a student must complete both ITAL-UA 1 and ITAL-UA 2. This sequence is equivalent to ITAL-UA 10. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Intermediate Italian I
 (ITAL-UA 11) Prerequisite: Intensive Elementary Italian (ITAL-UA 10), or Elementary Italian II (ITAL-UA 2), or assignment by placement test. Not equivalent to Intensive Intermediate Italian (ITALUA 20). Only by combining ITAL-UA 11 with ITAL-UA 12 can a student complete the equivalent of ITAL-UA 20 and then continue on to the postintermediate level. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Intermediate Italian II
 (ITAL-UA 12) Prerequisite: Intermediate Italian I (ITAL-UA 11) or assignment by placement test. Fulfills Core language requirement. To fulfill Core requirements and continue on to the post-intermediate level, a student must complete both ITAL-UA 11 and ITAL-UA 12. This sequence is equivalent to ITAL-UA 20. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Intensive Elementary Italian
 (ITAL-UA 10) Open to students with no previous training in Italian and to others on assignment by placement test. Completes the equivalent of Elementary Italian I and II in one semester. Offered every semester. 6 points.
Intensive Intermediate Italian
 (ITAL-UA 20) Prerequisite: Intensive Elementary Italian (ITAL-UA 10), or Elementary Italian II (ITAL-UA 2), or assignment by placement test. Completes the equivalent of Intermediate Italian I and II in one semester. Fulfills Core language requirement. Offered every semester. 6 points.
Advanced Language Courses
Advanced Review of Modern Italian
 (ITAL-UA 30) Prerequisite: Intermediate Italian II (ITAL-UA 12) or Intensive Intermediate Italian (ITAL-UA 20), or assignment by placement test, or permission of the instructor. Serves as prerequisite for other advanced courses in language, literature, and culture and society. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Systematizes and reinforces language skills through an intensive review of grammar and composition, lexical enrichment, improvement of speaking ability, and selected readings from contemporary Italian literature.
Conversations in Italian(ITAL-UA 101) Prerequisite: Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) or permission of the instructor. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Through discussions, oral reports, and readings, students improve pronunciation, become familiar with idiomatic expressions, and develop vocabulary that allows them to communicate with others on topics such as family and student life, politics, the arts, food, and fashion. Useful for students who are planning to study or travel abroad.
Creative Writing in Italian (
ITAL-UA 103) Prerequisite: Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) or permission of the instructor. Offered every fall. 4 points.
Students are encouraged to rewrite, parody, and shift genres, with the aim of improving their writing and reading techniques.
Advanced Composition
 (ITAL-UA 105) Prerequisite: Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) or permission of the instructor. Offered every spring. 4 points.
The approach is threefold: (1) intensive study of the syntactical structures of Italian; (2) reading and analysis of contemporary texts from various sources, such as newspapers, magazines, and literary works; and (3) frequent writing of short compositions stressing grammatical and syntactical accuracy, as well as variety of vocabulary.
Italian through Cinema
 (ITAL-UA 107) Prerequisite: Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) or permission of the instructor. Offered every spring. 4 points.
Aims to enrich knowledge of Italian language, culture, and society through screening and discussion of contemporary Italian cinema and detailed analysis of film scripts. Students are encouraged to use different idiomatic expressions and recognize regional linguistic variety. Special emphasis on developing a more extensive vocabulary and an expressive range suited to discussion of complex issues and their representation.
Italian through Opera
 (ITAL-UA 108) Identical to DRLIT-UA 820. Prerequisite: Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) or permission of the instructor. Offered every spring. Scarcella Perino. 4 points.
Designed to help students increase their understanding of the Italian language through exposure to famous Italian operas. Reading of librettos and listening to arias supplemented with critical materials on reception and on current performances. Operatic plots and settings are linked thematically to present day issues, leading to discussion of contemporary social and cultural perspectives.
Translation
 (ITAL-UA 110) Prerequisites: Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) or permission of the department. Offered every spring. Marchelli. 4 points.
Stresses the acquisition of vocabulary and complex idiomatic structures necessary for effective reading comprehension and written expression. Analysis of dialogue, style, and linguistic choices of each author, so as to explore the development of the written language, slang, regional expressions, and linguistic differences that have accompanied and defined the evolution of Italian over the past 20 years.
Literature Survey Courses
The prerequisite for the following courses is Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) or permission of the instructor.
Readings in Medieval and Renaissance Literature (
ITAL-UA 115) Identical to MEDI-UA 115. Offered every fall. 4 points.
Close reading of authors such as Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Machiavelli, and Ariosto. Covers Italian literature from its origins to the 17th century.
Readings in Modern Italian Literature
 (ITAL-UA 116) Offered every spring. 4 points.
Close reading of authors such as Alfieri, Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni, Verga, D’Annunzio, Moravia, and Calvino. Covers Italian literature from the 18th century to the contemporary period.
Advanced Literature Courses
The prerequisite for the following courses (when taught in Italian) is Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) or permission of the instructor. Either Readings in Medieval and Renaissance Literature (ITAL-UA 115) or Readings in Modern Italian Literature (ITAL-UA 116) is a recommended prerequisite. There are no prerequisites for courses taught in English.
Love and War in Renaissance Italy: Chivalric Romance and Epic
 (ITAL-UA 145) Offered every two to three years. Cox. 4 points.
Study of Lodovico Ariosto’s Orlando furioso (1532) and Torquato Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata (1581) in their historical context and in relation to the rich literary traditions of romance and epic that converge in them. Thematic focuses include the construction of gender and the representation of religious and racial “otherness.”
Dante’s Divine Comedy
 (ITAL-UA 270) Identical to MEDI-UA 271, COLIT-UA 270, and ENGL-UA 142 when taught in English. Offered every two to three years. Ardizzone. 4 points.
Students study The Divine Comedy both as a mirror of high medieval culture and as a unique text that breaks out of its cultural bounds. The entire poem is read, in addition to selections from the Vita Nuova and other complementary minor works.
Boccaccio’s Decameron (
ITAL-UA 271) Identical to MEDI-UA 271 when taught in English. Offered every two to three years. Ardizzone. 4 points.
A study of Boccaccio’s Decameron with particular emphasis on themes, conceptual innovations, and influences on French and English literatures.
Pirandello and the Contemporary Theatre (
ITAL-UA 274) Identical to DRLIT-UA 280 when taught in English. Offered every two to three years. 4 points.
An introduction to Luigi Pirandello’s major plays as they relate to the foundation of contemporary theatre. Attention is also paid to grotesque and futurist drama. Works studied include Sei personaggio in cerca d’autore, Cosi è (se vi pare), and Enrico IV.
Modern and Contemporary Italian Narrative
 (ITAL-UA 275) Offered every two to three years. 4 points.
Follows the development of Italian narrative from Manzoni and Verga to present-day trends in Italian prose. Emphasizes works of Tabucchi, Maraini, Pasolini, Morante, and Calvino.
Italian Cinema and Literature
 (ITAL-UA 282) Identical to DRLIT-UA 505. Offered every two to three years. Albertini. 4 points.
  Studies the relationship between Italian literature and post-World War II cinema, including the poetics and politics of the process of cinematic adaptation. Among the authors and directors examined are Lampedusa, Bassani, Sciascia, Visconti, Moravia, De Cespedes, DeSica, and Rosi.
Other Worlds: Traveling the Italian Way
 (ITAL-UA 283) Offered every two to three years. 4 points.
Taught in English. Focuses on the representation of travel experience in modern Italian literature and related media, especially 20th century cinema, modernist art, and underground comics. Spatial journeys abroad and in-country, as well as metaphorical intellectual, political, and spiritual travels.
Topics in Italian Literature
 (ITAL-UA 285) Offered every two to three years. 4 points.
Topics vary.
Italian American Life in Literature (
ITAL-UA 724) Identical to ENGL-UA 724. Offered every spring. Hendin. 4 points.
A study of the fiction and poetry through which Italian American writers have expressed their heritage, identity, and engagement in American life. From narratives of immigration to current work by “assimilated” writers, explores changing family relationships, sexual mores, and political and social concerns.
Topics in Renaissance Literature (
ITAL-UA 760) Offered every two to three years. 4 points.
Topics vary.
The Sicilian Novel
 (ITAL-UA 862) Offered every two to three years. Tylus. 4 points.
Writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, with particular attention to Sicily’s distinct literature and culture. Authors may include Verga, Pirandello, De Roberto, Lampedusa, Sciascia, Mario Puzo, Andrea Camilleri, Dacia Maraini, Elio Vittorini, and Vincenzo Consolo; films may include Cinema paradiso, La terra trema, Il Gattopardo, The Godfather, and Salvatore Giuliano.
Culture and Society Courses
The prerequisite for the following courses (when taught in Italian) is Advanced Review of Modern Italian (ITAL-UA 30) or permission of the instructor. There are no prerequisites for courses taught in English.
The Renaissance (
ITAL-UA 121) Identical to HIST-UA 121 and MEDI-UA 121. Offered every two to three years. Appuhn. 4 points.
From its origins in the 14th century to its waning at the end of the 16th century. Focuses on developments in Italy, especially the development of republican city-states, the social basis for the explosion in artistic and intellectual production, and the emergence of new forms of political and scientific analysis.
The Courtesan in Italian Renaissance Society and Culture (
ITAL-UA 142) Offered every two to three years. Cox. 4 points.
Examines the “honest courtesan” or cortigiana onesta. Contextualizes courtesans’ social position and cultural status, embracing elements of social history, literary history, and music and art history. Texts include representations of courtesans, such as the notorious dialogues of Pietro Aretino, and writings by courtesan poets, such as Tullia d’Aragona and Veronica Franco.
Machiavelli
 (ITAL-UA 147) Identical to MEDI-UA 147 and HIST-UA 123. Offered every other year. Albertini. 4 points.
The inventor of modern political science, Niccolo Machiavelli is one of the most original thinkers in the history of Western civilization. Machiavelli’s political, historical, and theatrical works are read in the context in which they were conceived—the much tormented and exciting Florence of the 15th and early 16th centuries, struggling between republican rule and the magnificent tyranny of the Medici family.
Giordano Bruno and the Art of Memory (
ITAL-UA 148) Identical to HIST-UA 126 and MEDI-UA 148. Offered every two to three years. Cipani. 4 points.
Memory devices reached a peak of refinement during the Italian Renaissance; they aimed to organize knowledge and were intended as tools for creative output. Examines their impact on the literary production of the time, highlighting the interdependence between textual and visual codes. Focuses on the heretic philosopher and cosmologist Giordano Bruno, burned at the stake by the Roman Inquisition in 1600, who conceived his imposing mnemonic system as an inner mirror of the infinite universe.
Dante and His World
 (ITAL-UA 160) Identical to MEDI-UA 801, ENGL-UA 143. Offered every two to three years. Ardizzone. 4 points.
Interdisciplinary introduction (in English) to late medieval culture. The literature, art, and music, as well as political, religious, and social developments of the time. Emphasizes the classical background of medieval culture and its transmission to the modern world. Readings include: selections from Dante, St. Augustine, Boethius, St. Francis , Brunetto Latini, Thomas Aquinas, and Boccaccio.
Italian Colonialism (
ITAL-UA 164)Identical to HIST-UA 204 and EURO-UA 161. Offered every two to three years. Ben-Ghiat. 4 points.
From the late 19th century through decolonization. Uses colonial travel literature, films, novels, diaries, memoirs, and histories to address the meaning of colonialism within Italian history and culture, the specificities of Italian colonialism, and the legacies of colonialism in contemporary Italy.
Italian Fascism (
ITAL-UA 165) Offered every two to three years. Ben-Ghiat. 4 points.
An interdisciplinary examination of the cultural production of the fascist period. Students examine the image that the fascist regime produced of itself through the study of popular novels, architecture, film, and political speeches.
Contemporary Italy (
ITAL-UA 166) Identical to EURO-UA 164. Offered every two to three years. Albertini, Ben-Ghiat. 4 points.
The political, cultural, economic, and social history of Italy since World War II. Topics: the transition to democracy, the Cold War, social and political movements of the late 1960s and 1970s, the battle against the Mafia, postwar emigration, the rise and fall of postwar Christian Democracy and Italian communism, and the emergence of new political parties.
Modern Italy (
ITAL-UA 168) Identical to EURO-UA 163, HIST-UA 168. Offered every two to three years. Ben-Ghiat, Merjian. 4 points.
A survey of Italian history from unification to the present. Examines the political, social, and cultural history of liberalism, fascism, World War II, Christian Democracy, and communism; the political crisis of the early 1990s; and the rise of new regional and rightist parties.
Topics in Renaissance Culture
 (ITAL-UA 172) Offered every semester. 4 points. 
Topics vary.
Topics in Italian Culture
 (ITAL-UA 173) Offered every semester. 4 points.
Topics vary.
Italian Films, Italian Histories I
 (ITAL-UA 174) Identical to DRLIT-UA 503. May be taken independently of Italian Films, Italian Histories II. Offered every two to three years. Albertini. 4 points.
Studies representations of Italian history from ancient Rome to the Risorgimento through the medium of film. The use of filmic history as a means of forging national identity.
Italian Films, Italian Histories II
 (ITAL-UA 175) Identical to DRLIT-UA 506 and HIST-UA 176. May be taken independently of Italian Films, Italian Histories I. Offered every two to three years. Ben-Ghiat. 4 points.
Studies representations of Italian history from the unification of Italy to the present through the medium of film. Explores the possibilities and limitations of feature films for the representation of history and asks: what happens when history becomes cinema and when cinema takes on history?
Topics in Italian American Culture
 (ITAL-UA 861) Offered every two years. 4 points.
Topics vary.
Internship
Internship
 (ITAL-UA 980, 981) Prerequisite: permission of the department. Does not count toward the major or minor. Offered every semester. 2 or 4 points per term.
Working closely with a sponsor and a faculty adviser, students may intern in such diverse areas as international trade, banking, publishing, community organizations, and television and radio programs. Interested students must apply to the department ahead of time.
Independent Study
Independent Study
 (ITAL-UA 997, 998) Prerequisite: permission of the department. Offered every semester. 2 or 4 points per term.
Honors Courses
Honors Independent Study
 (ITAL-UA 990 Prerequisite: Senior Honors Seminar (ITAL-UA 999)). Offered every spring. 4 points.
Open to students who have been accepted into the honors program in Italian studies and are writing the honors thesis in close consultation with their thesis adviser.
Senior Honors Seminar
ITAL-UA 999 Prerequisite: permission of the department. Offered every fall. 4 points.
Variable content. Prepares students for the senior honors thesis. Primary focus on research and the application of critical methodologies. Open to students who have been accepted to the honors program in Italian studies.
Graduate Courses Open to Undergraduates
Qualified undergraduates may register for graduate courses in Italian with the permission of the director of graduate studies. A list of appropriate graduate courses is available in the department each semester.