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Alexander Arnold

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

Email: 

ala287@nyu.edu

Alexander Arnold is a PhD candidate in New York University’s History Department and Institute of French Studies, as well as a fellow at the Center for International Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Focusing on modern European intellectual history, Alexander’s work integrates the history of economics with the history of science and the history of political thought. He is currently writing a dissertation provisionally entitled Rethinking Economics in Twentieth Century France.

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Danielle Beaujon

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

Email: 

djb571@nyu.edu

Danielle earned a B.A. in Honors History alongside a B.A. in French and European Studies at Vanderbilt University in 2015. Her senior honors thesis there focused on Algerian immigration to Marseille in the summer of 1962. The work examines the comparative history of two refugee populations, the Pieds-Noirs and the Harkis, with an emphasis on how bureaucratic programs put in place for their arrival led to successful integration for the Pieds-Noirs and continuing marginalization for the Harkis. Broadly, she is interested in the French nation’s struggle to re-define itself in the post-colonial era. In particular she studies the way in which new immigrant populations challenge traditional ideas of “French-ness” and citizenship.

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Drew Fedorka

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

Drew previously attended the University of Central Florida, earning both a B.A. with honors distinction (2012) and an M.A. (2015) in history. His master’s thesis tracked the emergence of teen-oriented popular culture in the early Fifth Republic. In it, he explored how certain media-constructed images of adolescence – the blousons noirs and the copains– captured shifting societal views about modernization, mass consumption, and national identity at the height of theTrente Glorieuses. His present research interests concern the social and cultural dimensions of postwar European integration, especially the role reserved for young people in the project of unification. He maintains general interest in mass consumption, travel and tourism, popular culture, and the mass media, particularly as these topics become implicated in larger historical phenomena.

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Sarah Griswold

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

Email: 

sarah.griswold@nyu.edu

I received a B.A. in history from Stanford University in 2002 and a M.A. in museum studies from the University of Leicester in 2005. I am interested in the history of scientific practices, the politics of culture, and the interwar mandates system in the Middle East. My dissertation examines the discipline of archaeology in French Mandate Syria and Lebanon during the years of European control. Through archives in Europe, the Middle East, and the United States, I study the part scientists played in shaping the mandate and the broader consequences of this story for the history of empire, internationalism, and intellectual exchange. My experience as a public historian, and my interest in material culture and the sociology of collecting shape how I approach my research.

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Hilary Handin

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

Email: 

hsh294@nyu.edu

Hilary earned a B.A. in history and French from Union College in 2008, a M.A. in French from Middlebury College in 2009, and a M.A.T. from Union Graduate College in 2011. Her theses explored the role of gender norms in both limiting and facilitating women’s resistance during the World War II occupation of France. She also employed gender as a lens through which to study the shearing of women accused of collaborating during the Occupation. She is interested in questions addressing gender, resistance and memory, particularly as they concern women’s experiences of and responses to trauma.

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Tony Haouam

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/French Literature

Email: 

twh265@nyu.edu

Tony earned a B.A. at La Sorbonne in Modern Literature, alongside a B.A. in Information and Communication sciences and a M.A. in Political Communication at CELSA - Paris Sorbonne. He studied in Istanbul at Galatasaray Üniversitesi for a semester and then worked as a French teaching assistant at Bard College for a year. His current research focuses on the construction of wit, irony and sarcasm through a sociological lens, particularly after major events like the Paris attacks of November 2015. He has previously written about political correctness in American higher education and the social representations of the French language in Turkish and Algerian societies. His other interests include notions of the transclass, ease and unease in conversation – “sprezzatura”, linguistic blunders, the act of passing – in contemporary Francophone literature; and the figure of the schoolmaster in film.

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Allison Korinek

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

Email: 

arkorinek@nyu.edu

Allison Korinek received her BA in History and Linguistics from Rice University in 2012, where her honors thesis explored urban renewal in Paris under the Second Empire. Her current research focuses on the establishment of empire in North Africa—particularly in Algeria—and the mobilization of language there as simultaneously a communicative aid and a coercive tool. She is interested in French conceptions of language and its usage, the tensions that arise in administering a polyglot empire, and the development of language hierarchies as one way to mediate colonial relations.

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Whitney Krahn

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/French Literature

Whitney Krahn attended New College of Florida and earned a B.A. in French and Francophone Studies from Columbia University in 2007. Later that same year, she entered the joint Ph.D. program in French Literature and French Studies at NYU. In 2009, she obtained the M.A. in French Literature and has since developed a dissertation topic centered on the writings of French architects in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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Hannah Leffingwell

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

Email: 

hrl260@nyu.edu

Hannah graduated from Mount Holyoke College in 2015 with a B.A. in English Literature and French. After studying abroad in Montpellier, France, she returned to Mount Holyoke to complete her honors thesis in French. This work included an original translation into English of Malek Alloula's book-length poem L'Accès au corps, as well as a critical introduction exploring translation theory in a postcolonial context. While pursuing her master's in French Studies at the IFS, Hannah's research interests evolved, driving her to focus on the history of French feminism in the wake of Mai 68'. Her research paper "Corps Féminin/Guerre Masculine: Radical Femininity in Tereska Torres’ Women’s Barracks" won the annual IFS award for best master's paper. In the coming year she hopes to continue exploring the intersections of race, class, sexual orientation, and gender in the second-wave feminist movement in France, as well as expanding her research to include postcolonial contexts.

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Gabriella Lindsay

 

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/French Literature

 

Email: 

gabriella.lindsay@gmail.com

 

B.A. McGill University, Master II, Université Montpellier III

 

 

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Erik Meddles

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

Email: 

erik.meddles@gmail.com

Erik Meddles is a third year PhD student in the Institute of French Studies and History Department. He received a MA degree from NYU in 2011 in French Studies and a BA degree from Regis University in Denver, Colorado in French and History. His dissertation examines the role of the body in imperial rule for French and American colonizers in Indochina and the Philippines. By selectively appropriating bodily practices from the indigenous cultures they sought to dominate and lead, French and American people in the colonies simultaneously faced opportunities and created dilemmas concerning the establishment of imperial power, race, and identity. Erik’s other interests include the gendered national symbolism of the Third Republic and the reorganization of the French army during the same period.

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Ian Merkel

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

M.A. New York University, French Studies, 2012; B.A. Carleton College, French and Francophone Studies, 2010 My dissertation is an inquiry into the intellectual exchanges between Brazil and France during the period 1930-1964, particularly in the social sciences. At once a collective treatment of the intellectuals who were part of a “French Mission” to found the University of São Paulo in the 1930s and a more detailed analysis of particular moments in the disciplines of history, sociology, and anthropology, this dissertation explores the particularly fruitful exchanges between French and Brazilian academics during an important moment of institutional, cultural, and social consolidation in Brazil. It also proposes to understand the importance of São Paulo’s intellectual life in the French social sciences, particularly through figures such as Claude Lévi-Strauss, Fernand Braudel, and Roger Bastide.

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Samantha Presnal

 

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/French Literature

 

Email: 

smp581@nyu.edu

 

M.A. New York University; B.A. Amherst College

Samantha earned her bachelor’s degree in French from Amherst College, where she wrote her senior thesis on the underrepresentation of female chefs in haute cuisine. She continues to be fascinated by France’s culinary culture, particularly how food—its production, preparation, presentation, and consumption—has come to be definitive of French identity(ies). Her master’s thesis marries stylistic and social analysis to expose the transgressive potential of women’s cookbooks of the Belle Époque. Her general research interests are in 19th- and 20th-century French culture and society, with a focus on culinary writing, cuisine, and gender. Other interests include consumption in 19th-century Paris; representations of the body in the 20th-century novel; and mobility, immigration, and empire.

 

 

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Kate Schnakenberg

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

Email: 

kas887@nyu.edu

Kate received her B.A. in International Studies from the University of Chicago in 2011 where she focused on memory and commemoration in 20th century Europe, especially in France. Her senior thesis explored the construction of the Mémorial de l'abolition de l'esclavage in Nantes with special focus on its relationship to shifts in a French national narrative. Her wider interests include the way memory of violent events is constructed, adopted, and politicized, as well as the functional differences between living and crystallized memory.

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Emily Shuman

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/French Literature

Email: 

eqs203@nyu.edu

Emily received her BA in French and Psychology from the University of Richmond in 2014. Her undergraduate honors thesis centered on a discourse analysis of French foreign policy from 2003-2013. After graduating, she spent a year working as an English language assistant in Strasbourg as part of the Teaching Assistant Program in France. Her current research interests reflect the political and historical contexts of literature, focusing on questions of memory and identity in francophone North Africa.

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Nicholas Truesdale

 

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/French Literature

 

Email: 

nicholas.truesdale@nyu.edu

 

Nicholas Truesdale is a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate at the Institute of French Studies and the Department of French. He earned his M.A. in French studies from NYU in 2010. He holds a B.A. summa cum laude in French and political science from Dickinson College (2008) and a Certificat d’études politiques from the Institut d’Études Politiques de Toulouse (2007). Nicholas’s dissertation research examines higher education access and equity in contemporary France, with a particular focus on the relationship of public universités to poverty- and working-class students. He investigates how these students experience curricular, student-life, and social-aid offerings in the wake of demographic changes to the profile of “the student.” His work also examines how universités teach and administer poverty- and working-class students amid the political context of uncertainty regarding educational “democratization,” “meritocracy,” and “equality of opportunity.” Additionally, Nicholas has designed an undergraduate syllabus that uses detective fiction to approach the study of literary genres and consecration as well as problems in French history.

 

 

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Aro Velmet

 

 

Ph.D. Joint IFS/History

 

Email: 

aro.velmet@nyu.edu

 

Aro Velmet is a sixth year PhD candidate in French Studies and History. He has a BA in history from the University of Pennsylvania. He works on the emergence of Pasteur Institutes as central nodes of technopolitics in the French empire in the early twentieth century. His dissertation seeks to understand how the development of Pastorian projects ranging from plague vaccines to industrial alcohol production produced struggles over the precise meaning of French scientific superiority in Indochina, Tunisia and West Africa, with broad political consequences for questions ranging from taxation and migration, to citizenship, international cooperation, and the justification for French rule in the colonies. Aro's earlier work has focused on interwar beauty pageants in France and North Africa, and museum politics in the Baltic States.