Current Course Offerings

Fall 2017 Course List

Courses Open to Non-Majors/Minor

(Also Open to Majors/Minors)

Number

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Cap

Class #

ENGL-UA 59

Digital Literary Studies: Novel Maps of NY

Prof. Pereira

MW

12:30-1:45

20

17622

ENGL-UA 250

19thC African American Lit

Prof. McHenry

TR

11:00-12:15

20

8497

ENGL-UA 410.001

Shakespeare

Prof. Halpern

MW

11:00-12:15

60

8392

ENGL-UA 410.002

Recitation

Prof. Trigos

F

9:30-10:45

15

8393

ENGL-UA 410.003

Recitation

Prof. Trigos

F

11:00-12:15

15

8394

ENGL-UA 410.004

Recitation

Prof. Porteous

F

12:30-1:45

15

8783

ENGL-UA 410.005

Recitation

Prof. Porteous

F

11:00-12:15

15

9215

ENGL-UA 640

Imagining Postwar America

Prof. Hendin

TR

3:30-4:45

20

8830

ENGL-UA 714

Literature of Riots

Prof. Hanson

MW

4:55-6:10

20

17459

ENGL-UA 728

Science Fiction

Prof. Hoover

R

2:00-4:45

20

8171

ENGL-UA 800.002

Literature and Science

Prof. Siskin

M

2:00-4:45

20

8383

Core Courses

Number

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Cap

Class #

ENGL-UA 101.001

Intro to the Study of Lit

Prof. Rust

MW

11:00-12:15*

14

8576

ENGL-UA 101.002

Intro to the Study of Lit

Prof. Versteegh

MW

9:30-10:45*

14

8577

ENGL-UA 101.003

Intro to the Study of Lit

Prof. Versteegh

MW

2:00-3:15*

14

8579

ENGL-UA 101.004

Intro to the Study of Lit

Prof. Shelnutt

TR

12:30-1:45*

14

8580

ENGL-UA 101.005

Intro to the Study of Lit

Prof. Crain

TR

11:00-12:15*

14

8581

ENGL-UA 101.006

Intro to the Study of Lit

Prof. McHenry

TR

9:30-10:45*

14

8582

ENGL-UA 101.007

Intro to the Study of Lit

Prof. Shelnutt

TR

2:00-3:15*

14

8584

ENGL-UA 210.001

British Literature I

Prof. Archer

TR

11:00-12:15

60

8093

ENGL-UA 210.002

Recitation

Prof. Meyers Usher

R

3:30-4:45

15

8094

ENGL-UA 210.003

Recitation

Prof. Meyers Usher

R

4:55-6:10

15

8095

ENGL-UA 210.004

Recitation

Prof. Addis

F

9:30-10:45

15

8096

ENGL-UA 210.005

Recitation

Prof. Addis

F

12:30-1:45

15

8097

ENGL-UA 220.001

British Literature II

Profs. McDowell/Nicholls

TR

2:00-3:15

60

6723

ENGL-UA 220.002

Recitation

Prof. Hall

R

3:30-4:45

15

6724

ENGL-UA 220.003

Recitation

Prof. Hall

R

4:55-6:10

15

6725

ENGL-UA 220.004

Recitation

Prof. Partridge

F

9:30-10:45

15

6726

ENGL-UA 220.005

Recitation

Prof. Partridge

F

12:30-1:45

15

6727

ENGL-UA 230.001

American Literature I

Profs. Baker/Posmentier

MW

12:30-1:45

60

6728

ENGL-UA 230.002

Recitation

Prof. Hegelmeyer

R

12:30-1:45

15

6729

ENGL-UA 230.003

Recitation

Prof. Hegelmeyer

R

4:55-6:10

15

6730

ENGL-UA 230.004

Recitation

Prof. Lopez

F

11:00-12:15

15

6731

ENGL-UA 230.005

Recitation

Prof. Lopez

F

9:30-10:45

15

6732

*Students enroll for one of the seminars, as well as one plenary lecture (listed as a recitation, RCT), that will meet ONLY four (4) times a semester on either a Thursday evening at 6:25-7:40 or Friday morning from 11:00-12:15. Students must enroll in one of these recitations to take the course.

Pre-1800

Number

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Cap

Class #

ENGL-UA 410.001

Shakespeare

Prof. Halpern

MW

11:00-12:15

60

8392

ENGL-UA 410.002

Recitation

Prof. Trigos

F

9:30-10:45

15

8393

ENGL-UA 410.003

Recitation

Prof. Trigos

F

11:00-12:15

15

8394

ENGL-UA 410.004

Recitation

Prof. Porteous

F

12:30-1:45

15

8783

ENGL-UA 410.005

Recitation

Prof. Porteous

F

11:00-12:15

15

9215

ENGL-UA 732

Papyrus to PDF:Intro to Book History NOW

McDowell/Priddle

R

9:30-12:15

12

8381

ENGL-UA 800.002

Literature and Science

Prof. Siskin

M

2:00-4:45

20

8383

Critical Theory

Number

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Cap

Class #

ENGL-UA 712.001

Major Texts in Critical Theory

Prof. Trujillo

TR

11:00-12:15

20

7841

ENGL-UA 712.002

Major Texts in Critical Theory

Prof. Versteegh

T

11:00-1:45

12

20706

ENGL-UA 735

Reading Derrida

Prof. Fleming

R

9:30-12:15

20

9041

ENGL-UA 780

Post-Apartheid South African Literature

Prof. Hofmeyr

MW

9:30-10:45

20

17618

ENGL-GA 1957*

Introduction to Marxism: Action and Event

Prof. Archer

T

4:50-7:15

12

18113

*Requires instructor permission; see description.

Advanced Electives

Number

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Cap

Class#

ENGL-UA 52.001+

Divine Comedy Part II

Prof. Ardizzone

W

3:30-6:10

5

18847

ENGL-UA 52.002+

Narrating the Mediterranean

Prof. Lakhous

MW

12:30-1:45

5

18848

ENGL-UA 52.003+

Machiavelli

Prof. Albertini

TR

2:00-3:15

5

18849

ENGL-UA 56.001+

What is Lyric?

Prof. Duffy

TR

12:30-1:45

5

18850

ENGL-UA 56.002+

American Scriptures

Prof. Harper

MW

9:30-10:45

5

20347

ENGL-UA 59

Digital Literary Studies: Novel Maps of NY

Prof. Pereira

MW

12:30-1:45

20

17622

ENGL-UA 163

Literature of Witnessing

Prof. Escobar

MW

12:30-1:45

20

17445

ENGL-UA 175

Intro to African Literature

TBD

W

2:00-4:45

20

17446

ENGL-UA 201*

Reading as a Writer

Prof. Noel

MW

2:00-3:15

12

8772

ENGL-UA 250

19thC African American Lit

Prof. McHenry

TR

11:00-12:15

20

8497

ENGL-UA 252.001+

Queer Utopias

Prof. Dinshaw

TR

11:00-12:15

5

17601

ENGL-UA 252.002+

Animality and Politics in Latin America

Prof. Giorgi

TR

3:30-4:45

5

17602

ENGL-UA 252.003+

Divine Love

Prof. Subirats

M

3:30-6:10

5

17603

ENGL-UA 252.004+

Disability Studies and Latin@ America

Prof. Noel

M

4:55-7:25

16

17604

ENGL-UA 410.001

Shakespeare

Prof. Halpern

MW

11:00-12:15

60

8392

ENGL-UA 410.002

Recitation

Prof. Trigos

F

9:30-10:45

15

8393

ENGL-UA 410.003

Recitation

Prof. Trigos

F

11:00-12:15

15

8394

ENGL-UA 410.004

Recitation

Prof. Porteus

F

12:30-1:45

15

8783

ENGL-UA 410.005

Recitation

Prof. Porteus

F

11:00-12:15

15

9215

ENGL-UA 640

Imagining Postwar America

Prof. Hendin

TR

3:30-4:45

20

8830

ENGL-UA 712.001

Major texts in Critical Theory

Prof. Trujillo

TR

11:00-12:15

20

7841

ENGL-UA 712.002

Major Texts in Critical Theory

Prof. Versteegh

T

11:00-1:45

12

20706

ENGL-UA 714

Literature of Riots

Prof. Hanson

MW

4:55-6:10

20

17459

ENGL-UA 716+

Asian American Literature

TBD

MW

11:00-12:15

20

8845

ENGL-UA 728

Science Fiction

Prof. Hoover

R

2:00-4:45

20

8171

ENGL-UA 732

Papyrus to PDF: Intro to Book History NOW

McDowell/Priddle

R

9:30-12:15

12

8381

ENGL-UA 735

Reading Derrida

Prof. Fleming

R

9:30-12:15

20

9041

ENGL-UA 761+

Irish Lit of 1930s and WWII

Prof. Sullivan

TR

11:00-12:15

35

8205

ENGL-UA 780

Post-Apartheid South African Literature

Prof. Hofmeyr

MW

9:30-10:45

20

17618

ENGL-UA 800.001

Reading Poetry

Prof. Nicholls

TR

9:30-10:45

20

8172

ENGL-UA 800.002

Literature and Science

Prof. Siskin

M

2:00-4:45

20

8383

ENGL-UA 995*

CLS Lab

Prof. Boggs

R

12:30-1:45

12

8964

ENGL-GA 1957*

Introduction to Marxism: Action and Event

Prof. Archer

T

4:50-7:15

12

18113

*Special requirements to enroll; see description.

+cross-listed course

Honors

Number

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Cap

Class #

ENGL-UA 925

Senior Honors Colloquium

Prof. Baker

W

3:30-4:45

35

6733

ENGL-UA 926

Senior Honors Thesis

Prof. Baker

-

-

-

6734

Creative Writing Track

Number

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Cap

Class #

ENGL-UA 201*

Reading as a Writer

Prof. Noel

MW

2:00-3:15

12

8772

*Special requirements to enroll; see description.

Senior Seminars

Number

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Cap

Class#

ENGL-UA 950

Medieval Interiorities

Prof. Strohm

R

3:30-6:10

12

8766

ENGL-UA 951

Christopher Marlowe: Renaissance Atheist

Prof. Guillory

MW

11-12:15

12

17467

ENGL-UA 952

Poetry and prose of the 17th Century

Prof. Gilman

MW

12:30-1:45

12

17465

ENGL-UA 963

Black Poetry and Social Movement(s)

Prof. Posmentier

W

2:00-4:45

12

8173

ENGL-UA 974

Poetry & Poetics: Romanticisms/Modernisms/Now

Prof. McLane

T

3:30-6:10

12

8767

ENGL-UA 975

Modern Asian Novel

Prof. Watson

T

3:30-6:10

12

8384

Fall 2017 Course Descriptions

ENGL-UA 52.001 | Divine Comedy - Part II - Purgatorio

Email ma4542@nyu.edu for permission to take this course.

The second of a sequence of two semesters, the course is conceived as a reading of Dante’s Purgatorio, part 2 (canti 17-33) and Paradiso. We will start with a general introduction to Dante’s Commedia in order to orient the students to an understanding of Dante’s masterpiece.

ENGL-UA 52.002 | Narrating the Mediterranean: Literature, Cinema and Media

The Mediterranean has become a place of death and violence, in short an open cemetery. The distance between the two banks for the Mediterranean is only fourteen kilometers, the length of the Strait of Gibraltar. In reality, this is false. The real distance is much longer owing to colonial memory, misunderstandings, prejudices, fear, etc. What do we have to do to reduce the distance? How can we narrate the Mediterranean today? What is the relationship between present and past? Why is Europe failing at the issue of immigration? My idea is that immigration, especially from the Muslim world, has become more and more a sort of “bargaining chip” in politics and in the media. Politicians tend to invest in propaganda against immigrants in order to win elections. Journalists, on the other hand, are interested primarily in attracting a larger audience. If the immigrant is a “bargaining chip”, it’s not hard to enlarge the metaphor by saying that politicians and journalists are merchants and citizens are simply customers.

ENGL-UA 52.003 | Machiavelli

The inventor of modern political science, Niccolò Machiavelli is one of the most original thinkers in the history of Western civilization. In this course, Machiavelli's political, historical, and theatrical works are read in the context in which they were conceived—the much tormented and exciting Florence of the 15th and early 16th centuries, struggling between republican rule and the magnificent tyranny of the Medici family.

ENGL-UA 56.001 | What is Lyric?

This course will attempt to produce a working, historically-informed theory of the lyric form through a careful consideration of ancient, medieval, and early modern examples. Poets will include an ancient cluster (Sappho, Anacreon, Pindar, Horace, and Juvenal), a medieval cluster, both vernacular and in Latin (the Harley Lyrics, Troubadour verse, the Cambridge Lyrics, and the Carmina Burana), and a Renaissance cluster (Dante, Petrarch, Garcilaso de la Vega, Francisco de Quevedo, Pierre de Ronsard, Joachim du Bellay, Thomas Wyatt, Sir Philip Sidney, and John Donne). Some considerations of recent lyric theory by Jonathan Culler, Heather DuBrow, Ullrich Langer, and others will add to our discussion.

ENGL-UA 56.002 | American Scriptures

This course is a survey of America’s sacred literature.  In addition to examining the publication and reading/reception histories of traditional religious scriptures in the United States (Christian Bibles, the Torah, etc.), we will explore the array of scriptures produced and disseminated over the past two hundred years.  Our exploration will include texts that purport to supplement traditional canons, to offer authoritative commentary on old traditions, or to supersede older forms of religion.

In all cases, we will track how and why the United States was and is fertile territory for the production of “new” scriptures and reinterpretations of “old” scriptures.  How do texts (and their authors) create and sustain authority in a diverse nation, among a democratic readership?  What do terms like “sacred” and “religious” mean when they are used to describe (or to advertise) literature and the reading practices surrounding it?  What does it mean to “read religiously?”

ENGL-UA 59.001 | Digital Literary Studies: Novel Maps of New York | Prof. de Sá Pereira

How does the geography of New York City shape the literature of New York City? Does the literature shape the geography in return? In thiscourse, we aim to understand the spatiotemporality of the Big Apple through novels of the 20th and 21st centuries that recreate and react to it. Not only will we read spatially, however, but we will also create spatially. Students will make maps that launch projects of geographical storytelling as a mode of literary analysis. More

concretely, we will build online data repositories and exhibits (using JavaScript and HTML) that synthesize our reading and mapping practices. No previous programming knowledge is needed, but a curiosity and interest in puzzle solving is. Novels we read may be from among those by Renata Adler, Julia Alvarez, Teju Cole, Don DeLillo, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tanwi Nandini Islam, Rachel Kushner, Imbolo Mbue, Claude McKay, Toni Morrison, Ann Petry, Ernesto Quiñonez,Kim Stanley Robinson, Tess Slesinger, Edith Wharton, and Colson Whitehead.

ENGL-UA 101.001 | Introduction to the Study of Literature | Prof. Rust

This introduction to the study of literature will be loosely organized around the theme of home. Encompassed under this heading will be the idea of home as a special kind of dwelling place along with a broad spectrum of more abstract or metaphorical ideas of home, including notions of homelands, home languages, homes away from home, and the possibilities of being at home with oneself and at home in the world. We’ll also encounter a variety of misuses of the idea of home along with home’s antithesis, exile. Our discussions of these various ideas of home will serve as starting points for fulfilling the primary purpose of the course: honing students’ skills in analytic reading and writing and furthering their understanding of literary genres and the terms used both to describe and to analyze them.

ENGL-UA 101.002 | Introduction to the Study of Literature | Prof. Versteegh

Intended as a primer on the practice of literary criticism, this course is structured around some deceptively straightforward questions. What is literature, why does it exist, and how do we study it? For answers, we’ll look to literature itself, querying a series of works loosely organized under the rubric “writing on writing”: stories about storytelling; narratives that hinge upon acts of reading; pieces that thematize literary creation; texts that foreground their status qua texts. Assignments will stress the development of critical vocabulary and a variety of analytical tools, as we track the roles, places, effects, and problems of literature across a spectrum of genres, historical periods, and cultural contexts. From the Brownings to Bukowski, Shakespeare to The Pillowman, our readings will include poems, essays, short stories, novels, and plays—some canonical, some decidedly not. Each week we’ll sidle closer to the big questions by posing our own smaller, more specific ones: How is writing like torture? Do vowels have distinct personalities? Can we construct an algorithm that generates poetry? And just how much alteration does it take to ruin a great piece of literature?

ENGL-UA 101.003 | Introduction to the Study of Literature | Prof. Versteegh

Intended as a primer on the practice of literary criticism, this course is structured around some deceptively straightforward questions. What is literature, why does it exist, and how do we study it? For answers, we’ll look to literature itself, querying a series of works loosely organized under the rubric “writing on writing”: stories about storytelling; narratives that hinge upon acts of reading; pieces that thematize literary creation; texts that foreground their status qua texts. Assignments will stress the development of critical vocabulary and a variety of analytical tools, as we track the roles, places, effects, and problems of literature across a spectrum of genres, historical periods, and cultural contexts. From the Brownings to Bukowski, Shakespeare to The Pillowman, our readings will include poems, essays, short stories, novels, and plays—some canonical, some decidedly not. Each week we’ll sidle closer to the big questions by posing our own smaller, more specific ones: How is writing like torture? Do vowels have distinct personalities? Can we construct an algorithm that generates poetry? And just how much alteration does it take to ruin a great piece of literature?

ENGL-UA 101.004 | Introduction to the Study of Literature | Prof. Shelnutt

This course introduces students to the study of literature, focusing on the practice of carefully analyzing textual detail alongside the cultural, historical, and critical contexts that shape our ideas about what literature is and does. We will explore primary texts from a range of periods and genres, such as poetry, short fiction, non-fiction, and drama. Our goals include: to practice reading, analytically and imaginatively; to learn a vocabulary that will help you express your thoughts about what you read in the language of the field; to consider ways in which literary categories are less than stable; to become aware of different ways of reading; and to develop skills in writing thoughtfully and compellingly about literature at the college level. Students will be expected to actively participate in discussion, to work collaboratively with their peers in the classroom and for at least one group assignment, and to practice writing and revising through a series of short and longer papers.

ENGL-UA 101.005 | Introduction to the Study of Literature | Prof. Pat Crain

In this section of English 101, students will read closely, discuss thoughtfully, and write copiously about a range of texts, with a slight tilt towards American works (Melville, Dickinson, but also Virginia Woolf), across periods and genres: poetry, the novel, the tale, and drama, along with essays modeling critical voices and theoretical approaches.  The dramatic text will depend on what’s on theatrical offer in the fall, as we’ll hope to go to a performance (likely a Shakespeare play). Four plenary lectures by English Department faculty introduce students to some of the questions literary scholars ask and the kinds of materials they work with. Students will have a chance to strengthen their close reading, discussion, presentation, editing, and revising skills, their knowledge and use of literary-critical and cultural-studies terminology, and all the methods for translating the pleasures and labors of reading into those of analyzing and writing about literary artifacts.

ENGL-UA 101.006 | Introduction to the Study of Literature | Prof. Liz McHenry

This course introduces students to the basic methods of professional academic literary study, focusing in particular on the close textual analysis that lies at the heart of much scholarship in the field.  We will read closely and deeply in a small number of English-language works drawn from a range of periods and canonical genres, including poetry, drama, and both fictional and non-fictional prose.  Students will develop sensitivity to different ways of reading and the importance of historical, cultural and critical contexts of literature and literary study.  The object is for students to gain the skills needed to think about, talk about, and write about literature at the highest level of analytical sophistication.  Over the course of the semester students should expect to think critically about the processes of reading and writing, to participate in vibrant discussions about a variety of texts (some of them visual), and to practice writing and revising through a series of formal essays

ENGL-UA 101.007 | Introduction to the Study of Literature | Prof. Shelnutt

This course introduces students to the study of literature, focusing on the practice of carefully analyzing textual detail alongside the cultural, historical, and critical contexts that shape our ideas about what literature is and does. We will explore primary texts from a range of periods and genres, such as poetry, short fiction, non-fiction, and drama. Our goals include: to practice reading, analytically and imaginatively; to learn a vocabulary that will help you express your thoughts about what you read in the language of the field; to consider ways in which literary categories are less than stable; to become aware of different ways of reading; and to develop skills in writing thoughtfully and compellingly about literature at the college level. Students will be expected to actively participate in discussion, to work collaboratively with their peers in the classroom and for at least one group assignment, and to practice writing and revising through a series of short and longer papers.

ENGL-UA 163 | Literature of Witnessing | Prof. Escobar

What does it mean to bear witness? What differences are there between participant and observer? How might the nature of violence complicate representation, language, and literary expression? How are memories transmitted to the next generation?

This course will ask these questions and examine how writers from the global south imagine and represent the figure of the witness. Drawing on diverse genres such as non-fiction, drama, and the novel, we will consider topics including configurations of “the human,” relationships among trauma, disability, and affect, “forensic witnessing,” “migrant melancholia,” and the ethics of speaking for others. Cultural contexts will stress genealogies of colonial catastrophe, endurance, and resistance.

Works to be read: Miguel Barnet and Esteban Montejo’s Biography of a Runaway Slave, Ariel Dorfman’s Death and the Maiden, Horacio Castellanos Moya’s Senselessness, Edwidge Danticat’s The Dew Breaker, Michael Ondaatje’s Anil’s Ghost, Oscar Martínez’s The Beast, Sonia Nazario’s Enrique’s Journey, and Mohamedou O. Slahi’s Guantánamo Diary.

ENGL-UA 201 | Reading as a Writer: Writing the City | Prof. Noel

How can creative writing engage the city in ways that complement or complicate the academic study of urban space (e.g. by historians, urban planners, sociologists, and others)? Working across genres, cultures, and aesthetics, we will examine and respond to attempts to write the city, by poets, fiction writers, playwrights, and others, strategically blurring the lines between creative and critical engagement. While our focus will be on New York City, students will be encouraged to research and imagine connections to other urban spaces, present, past, or future. Readings may include literary texts by Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Langston Hughes, Federico García Lorca, Henry Roth, H.T. Tsiang, Pedro Pietri, Audre Lorde, Kathy Acker, Shaun Tan, Josefina Báez, and Claudia Rankine, as well as critical texts about cities from fields such as history, urban studies, sociology, anthropology, geography, and economics. We will also do one or more excursions (possible venues include the Nuyorican Poets Cafe, the Poe Cottage in the Bronx, and the Downtown Collection at NYU's Fales Library), and we will host one or more guest writers. Pre-req is ENGL-UA 101/200. ENROLLMENT IS RESTRICTED TO ENGLISH MAJORS/MINORS, FIRST COME FIRST SERVED; PRE-REQ is ENGL-UA 101/200. TO BE ENROLLED: Please fill out the following form, and include a statement of approximately 300 words about the kind of reader/writer you are right now, including a specific description of a piece of art NOT by you (a poem, a novel, a painting, a movie, an essay, something else) that you love (or, if you wish, hate).

https://goo.gl/forms/SNCxGwLo7Y4eQMum1

ENGL-UA 210 |  British Literature I | Prof. Archer                                       

British Literature I is a survey of English literature from its origins in Anglo-Saxon poetry through the seventeenth century and John Milton. This course will trace the formation of an English-language community from different ethnic and linguistic strands through the history of the written imagination in the British Isles. The possible origins and early development of concepts such as nationalism, racial difference, and colonialism will be considered. Gender and sexuality will help determine what, how, and who we read. Attention to media (writing, speaking, and eventually print) will also help us enjoy the form and beauty of the imaginative texts we study. Lectures and recitations will encourage close reading of representative works, with attention to the historical, intellectual, aesthetic, and social contexts. Term papers and other regular writing assignments, midterm, final exam; in-class quizzes and exercises. Recitation required: You must be enrolled in a Recitation to receive a grade for this class.

Prerequisites:  ENGL-UA 200: Literary Interpretation

Textbook: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Ninth Edition, Volumes A & B

Works to be read include: Beowulf ; Marie de France: “Lanval,” Geoffrey Chaucer: Canterbury Tales selections, Margery Kempe selections; a medieval play; poems by Thomas Wyatt, the Earl of Surrey and Queen Elizabeth; Edmund Spenser, Faerie Queene selections; poems by Aemilia Lanyer, John Donne, and Ben Jonson; a Shakespeare play; Katherine Philips; Margaret Cavendish; John Milton, Paradise Lost selections.

ENGL-UA 220 | British Literature II | Profs. McDowell and Nicholls

This course offers an intensive introduction to major works of British literature drawn from poetry, prose, drama, and fiction from the Restoration to the 20th Century.  We will consider how these writers responded to the conflicts and continuities of their culture, paying close attention to their explorations of questions of genre, power and identity. Through lectures, class discussion, written responses, and longer essay assignments, students will master the fundamentals of literary history and critical reading and writing.

ENGL-UA 230 | American Literature I | Profs. Baker and Posmentier

Surveys the evolution of literary themes and forms from the period of European exploration through the Civil War, tracing distinctive traditions of writing and thinking that have shaped the development of modern literature and thought in the United States. How, in particular, did this writing and thought address religious, political and economic conflict? How was it shaped by encounters between European and native American cultures; the arts of religious devotion and cosmopolitan enlightenment; the cultural politics of revolution and modern nationalism; responses to the expansion of capitalism and slavery; the development of print media and modern literary values; and the philosophy and aesthetics of American transcendentalism and sentimentalism?

ENGL-UA 250 | 18th and 19th Century African American Literature | Prof. McHenry

This course examines the development of black literary expression in the eighteenth and nineteenth century United States by reading a diverse selection of writers and texts (some classic, some not) that have fundamentally shaped what might be called the African American literary tradition. Through slave narratives, poetry, novels, autobiographies and memoirs, and speeches and journalism we will trace the dynamic circulation and transmission of ideas by African Americans, free and slave, as well as the relationship between cultural production and historical phenomena. We will pay particular attention to the ways that African Americans negotiated and troubled the divide between history and fictional forms, and how their fictions worked to produce alternative understandings of national history and civil liberty than that which had emerged from the “founding fathers.” The second part of the semester will take up post-emancipation literature: why, we will ask, did black authors return their readers to antebellum slavery in the post- bellum years seemingly at the very moment they wished to cultivate their image as “new Negroes” and self-consciously create a Negro literature with a lasting impact in the twentieth century? How did African Americans negotiate through language and in literary terms the competing and contested concerns of heritage and historical memory, on the one hand, with the deterioration of race relations and rise of slavery’s legacy of racial thought in the years W.E.B. Du Bois famously identified with the “problem of the color line”? Students will be introduced to the critical questions and paradigms that are central to African American letters, exploring how black literature engages with the politics of cultural identity formation, and notions of freedom, citizenship, and aesthetic forms.

ENGL-UA 252.001 | Queer Utopias

Are utopias always a little bit queer? In this course we will explore utopias past, present, and future, drawing on critical theory to help illuminate various visions of the perfect No Place. A nowhere that is somewhere, at least in the mind: from imaginary landscapes (the Garden of Eden, located on medieval maps) to real places (Black Mountain in North Carolina), from the body as assemblage to the digital GIF file, we will outline some characteristics of utopian thinking -- never without dystopia -- and queer world-making. Analyzing the conditions of possibility of such thinking, we will seek the transformational and follow our longing, reading medieval fables of monks visiting Paradise; early modern science fiction; and modern and contemporary visions in a range of genres and media, including speculative fiction, manifesto, memoir, film, digital media, performance, and activism. Authors/artists/dreamers who will help us imagine a better, queerer place may include Theodor Adorno, Gloria Anzaldúa, Ernst Bloch, Octavia Butler, Margaret Cavendish, Samuel Delany, Harry Dodge, Michel Foucault, Kazuo Ishiguro, Jill Johnston, Elektra KB, Audre Lorde, José Estéban Muñoz, Beatriz Preciado, Jack Smith, and Valerie Solanas.

ENGL-UA 252.002 | Animality and Politics in Latin America

In Latin American cultures, the unstable distinction between human and animal has been a recurring question in aesthetic production and political imagination. The very distinction between nature and culture --central to imaginaries of civilization, progress and modernity -- depends on a clear separation of the animal from the human; so does the notion of political order and civility, haunted in the region by the figure of the "bárbaro" and its untamed animality. Economic development is also unthinkable without turning animal life into a capitalizable resource --but this process does not take place without tensions and violence. Latin American cultures have thus developed with and against the animal --besieged by animality, and at the same time in a persistent intimacy with animals. This course is aimed at exploring how aesthetic, culture and politics interface around the question of the animal in Latin American cultures since mid-19th century to the present.  Its main goal is to discuss how imaginaries of the modern --cultural, social and economic modernity-- are inseparable from a discussion about the ambivalent limit between human and animal. We'll read and analyze literary materials from 19th and 02th century, as well as more contemporary production. Readings include Clarice Lispector, Roberto Bolaño, D.F. Sarmiento, Horacio Quiroga, José Eustasio Rivera, Euclides da Cunha, Joao Guimaraes Rosa, Roberto Arlt, Julio Cortázar, Silvina Ocampo and Marosa di Giorgio,among others. We will also discuss films such as La mujer de los perros, by Citerella and Llinás, and Boi neón, by Gabriel Mascaro.

ENGL-UA 252.003 | Divine Love

This course will focus on the following topics: The saga of Eden and the origins of Patriarchalism. The goddesses Inanna and Eva, and the Tree of Life & Knowledge. The Song of Songs. Plato’s Love in Symposion. The Indian poems of Gita Govinda. The initiation to Love in: Apuleius’ Eros and Psyche. Love of God in de Kabbalah and Christianism: Zohar, and Saint Teresa. Leone Ebreo and Cosmic Love. Ibn al’Arabí erotic mysticism, and Dante’s La vita nuova. Finally, Freud’s conception of sublime libido.

ENGL-UA 252.004 | Disability Studies and Latin@ America

This seminar explores Latin@ American literature through the framework of disability studies, an interdisciplinary field that interrogates disability as it is socially constructed while seeking out alternative/non-ableist politics and aesthetics. With an emphasis on 20th- and 21st-century Latin American fiction, but also considering poetry and intermedial work as well as works by U.S. Latin@ authors, we will pay particular attention to how bodies are represented in literature, and to how literature can model new social bodies.

Primary readings may include literary texts by authors such as Jorge Luis Borges, Mario Bellatin, Lina Meruane, Matías Celedón, Gloria Anzaldúa, Carmen Lyra, Aurora Levins Morales, Pedro Pietri, and Rita Indiana Hernández. Critical readings may include essays from Susan Antebi's recently published edited volume Latin American Literature and Film through Disability Studies, as well as works by scholars such as Tobin Siebers, David Mitchell and Sharon Snyder, Robert McRuer, Lennard J. Davis, Ato Quayson, Christopher Bell, Alison Kafer, and Suzanne Bost. Assignments may include a short midterm paper, regular contributions to a course blog, and a final creative-critical project. There will also be screenings and special visitors.

ENGL-UA 400 | Hamlet: Before and After | Prof. Halpern

For Hamlet as for Hamlet, the time is out of joint. We will take a semester-long look at the past and future of Shakespeare’s most famous play, focusing both on its transformation of source materials and on subsequent dramatic, critical and philosophical responses. Inserting Hamlet into a long arc of literary and cultural history will allow us to see how it both rewrites the past and anticipates its own future. We will look at early versions of the Hamlet story by Saxo Grammaticus and Belleforest, classical tragedies by Sophocles and Seneca, and revenge tragedies by Thomas Kyd to see how Shakespeare reworks these sources and analogues. We will also explore twentieth-century responses to Hamlet by playwrights such as Tom Stoppard and Heiner Müller, and philosophers such as Jacques Derrida. And we will study the complex textual history of the play.

ENGL-UA 410 | Shakespeare | Prof. Halpern

Why is Shakespeare still a vital cultural force 400 years after his death? How was he able to speak both to us and to audiences of his own day? This course will survey Shakespeare’s major plays and poems, and will look at their historical, cultural and theatrical contexts. But we will also consider Shakespeare’s afterlife on stage and screen, including performances by Kenneth Branagh, Ian McKellen and Mark Rylance. We will read the following plays: The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Richard III, Henry IV Part 1, Henry V, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, A Winter’s Tale and The Tempest. Course requirements: two papers of 5-6 pages each, a midterm and a final exam.

ENGL-UA 607 | Contemporary Brit Lit: Ghosts, Migrants, Astronauts | Prof. Sandhu

“When a person dies, he constantly roams about and becomes a ghost

It is the soul that roams about.

The roaming soul is like air.

So a ghost is like air. It can go everywhere” (Bhawan Singh, Indian prisoner of war, 1917)

“Full of the excitement of arrival, the migrant said, ‘Here you can find gold on the ground. I am going to start looking for it.’ The friend who had been in the city for two years answered him: ‘That is true. But the gold fell from very high in the sky, and so when it hit the earth, it went down very very deep.” (John Berger, A Seventh Man, 1975)

“Far above the world

Planet Earth is blue

And there’s nothing I can do” (David Bowie, Space Oddity, 1969)

This is a class about people who move, who are forced to move, whose descriptions of movement move readers and listeners and filmgoers. This is a class about empire and post-empire and, not just black and Asian writers, but displaced rural dwellers, Roma, ‘mad travellers’, Poles, Irish itinerants. This is a class about people who have been orphaned by the end of manufacturing, about working-class communities rendered obsolete by political and economic ideologues, about loneliness, about utopia.

This is a class about fear and hatred and defeat. This is also a class about dreams and yearning and giant steps. We will look at photo-texts and ghost stories and horror films and science fiction.

We will explore outer space, inner space, and the dream life of pixels.

We will listen to Morrissey and David Bowie and pirate radio.

And read the memoir of a man who drilled a hole in his head.

Final papers may be submitted in the form of screenplays, short stories, creative non-fiction, radiophonic pieces.

ENGL-UA 640 | Imagining Postwar America | Prof. Hendin

Fiction since 1945 reflects the creative ferment of a period of extraordinary cultural unrest. How writers and poets attempted to define and respond to the idea of the "new" or the "transformed" may illuminate specific works of literary art and the cultural contexts in which they were created.  Through intensive readings in fiction and critical theory, the course explores innovations in genres, mores and forms, emphasizing the aesthetics and cultural meanings forged by novelists and analyzed by critics and social theorists in a period of creative richness and troubling uncertainty.

ENGL-UA 712.001 | Major texts in Critical Theory | Prof. Trujillo

Land, Labor, Property and the Politics of Theory

This course introduces students to key concepts and texts of critical theory. It does so by interrogating the modern categories of property, labor, and land and the vexed genealogies of violence and power that are inscribed in them. We will inquire into the ways these categories emerge as central to the colonial processes that constitute Euroamerican modernity, such as the invention of race, the formation of the nation-state, and the ascendance of capitalist political economies. Our inquiry will weave a number of classical and canonical theoretical texts from a European continental tradition with a range of Black, Latinx, Indigenous, and subaltern writing that fundamentally rethinks the politics and place of theoretical enunciation.

ENGL-UA 712.002 | Major texts in Critical Theory | Prof. Versteegh

TBA

ENGL-UA 714 | Literature of Riots | Prof. Lenora Hanson

Saboteurs and slaves, anarchists and insurrectionists, the unemployed man and the working-class woman. These characters make up the ranks of rioters in eighteenth and nineteenth-century literature and journalistic writing. This course looks to such accounts in order to define a literature of riots.

Throughout the semester, we will consider the relationship between the history and writing of riots. On the one hand, we will ask what discernible effects riots and their social, economic, and political contexts might be said to have on novels, poetry, and other writing. While the idea of revolutionary literature has been commonplace since at least the nineteenth century, we will discuss the features of what might be called a literature of riots. Looking to instances of food and prison riots, of sabotage, insurrection and slave rebellion, we will consider how writing that spans from roughly 1720-1850 responded to those specific, and often highly localized, events. On the other hand, we will treat the riotous as a literary style, attempting to understand why certain kinds of literature came to be described as spontaneous and anarchic, unconscious and animalistic, or feminine and passive in much the same manner as riots. As literary writing was frequently criticized for demonstrating such unsettling qualities, our task is to understand what connection literature and riots might have beyond the documentary or contextual.

Questiona that inspire this course include: Can figurative language and narrative form do more than represent riots and similar events that erupted throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? How might poetic form help us to understand material demands rather than revolutionary ideals? How do poems and novels deal differently with the population “problem” and the mounting socio-political pressures induced by it? Does novelistic narrative establish coherence or create anarchy? And how does literature’s obsession with circulation make riots in England inseparable from rebellions in the colonies?

Authors may include: Daniel Defoe, Thomas Malthus, Hannah More, William Godwin, William Blake, Edmund Burke, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, William Cobbett, John Gareth Stedman, Juan Francisco Manzano, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Karl Marx, Charles Dickens, John Clare and others. We will also read selected critical sources.

ENGL-UA 716 | Asian American Lit | Prof. Sandhu

This overview course examines the production of Asian American writing and literary/cultural criticism up to the present. Focuses on significant factors affecting the formation of Asian American literature and criticism, such as changing demographics of Asian American communities and the influence of ethnic, women's, and gay/lesbian/bisexual studies. Included is a variety of genres (poetry, plays, fiction and nonfiction, literary/cultural criticism, and nontraditional forms) by writers from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Explores the ways in which the writers treat issues such as racial and ethnic identity, immigration and assimilation, gender, class, sexuality, nationalism, culture and community, history and memory, and art and political engagement.

ENGL-UA 728 | Science Fiction | Prof. Hoover

This course considers contemporary science fiction as literature, social commentary, prophecy, thought-experiment, and as a reflection of recent and possible future trends in technology and society. The main emphasis will be on the literary qualities of the texts, but we will also use insights from text world theory to consider the various methods science fiction writers use to create their imagined worlds, and what their fictions have to say about human nature. We will also experiment with altering texts or excerpts of texts as a method of examining how they are constructed. Finally, some of the readings for the semester involve apocalypses of various kinds. The nature, function, and effect of these apocalypses, and the way the characters react to them will also be an important focus.

NOVELS:

Isaac Asimov. I, Robot. New York: Bantam, 2008

Margaret Atwood. The Handmaid’s Tale. New York: Anchor Books, 1998.

Ray Bradbury. Farenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2013. ISBN-10: 1451673310

Orson Scott Card. Ender’s Game. New York: Tor Science Fiction, 1994.

Philip K. Dick. Ubik. Mariner Books, 2012.

Frank Herbert. Dune. New York: Ace, 1990.

Ursula K. Le Guin. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Scribner, 2008.

Cormac McCarthy. The Road. New York: Vintage, 2007.

Judith Moffett. Pennterra. 1987. New York: Fantastic Books, 2009.

Mary Doria Russell. The Sparrow: A Novel. New York: Ballantine, 1997.

George R. Stewart. Earth Abides. New York: Del Ray Books, 2006.

John Wyndham. The Day of the Triffids. New York: Modern Library, 2003.

WORK, REQUIREMENTS, AND GRADING: Your most important work is the active reading of the texts; there is a GREAT DEAL of reading, so keep up and think about what you read. Quizzes on most assigned readings (20% of grade); these will be short answers and/or brief paragraphs at the beginning of class. No make-ups are allowed, but an excused absence also excuses any quiz on that day.

-A mid-term exam (20% of grade).

-A paper (about 12-15 pages); electronic submission only (30% of grade).

-A late-term exam (20% of grade).

-Attendance and participation (10% of grade).

ENGL-UA 732 | Papyrus to PDF: An Introduction to Book History NOW

This course, co-taught in the NYU Fales Library and Special Collections at Bobst Library by a librarian and an English professor, provides an introduction to the booming interdisciplinary field(s) of Book History. A discipline that engages researchers in many different fields of study (history, literature, librarianship, media and communications, and sociology, to name only a few), Book History addresses more than just books: it investigates the production, dissemination, and readership of texts of all kinds, from papyrus to illuminated manuscripts and from the Gutenberg Bible to modern e-books. What unites book historians is a conviction that material artifacts are irreplaceably important: whether those artifacts be cuneiform tablets, handwritten letters, printed and illustrated books, or e-readers. Our course will address a wide range of general topics, punctuated by case studies of particular artifacts and key historical events and debates. Case studies will pull together threads of inquiry from the course readings and allow students to work from specific material texts (16th to 21st century) to larger questions of social, cultural, and historical importance. Sample topics include the introduction and spread of printing technology; practices and ideas of authorship, readership, and publishing; censorship and intellectual property, non-book formats (magazines, periodicals, and ephemera), the physical and virtual preservation of texts, and the future of the book.

The course offers students the unique opportunity to study and work with objects and tools of the trade not only at NYU Special Collections but also at world-class institutions such as the New York Public Library (Rare Books and Manuscripts Division) and the New York Center for Book Arts.

Course Materials: Michelle Levy and Tom Mole, eds. The Broadview Reader in Book History (2015) Additional readings to be made available on reserve or in digital form via our course website.

ENGL-UA 735 | Reading Derrida | Prof. Fleming

This course assumes no prior knowledge of Derrida’s thought: its aim is to provide students with the experience of reading Derrida’s writing in a close and sustained manner, and its assumption is that whenever we read Derrida’s texts, we do so as if for the first time.  Nevertheless, reading Derrida is difficult, and if you don't want to work hard at it this is not the course for you!  Pervious students in this class have found that ‘Fleming expects more from us than the average NYU professor’ and warned ‘Fleming and Derrida are not for everyone.’ For those who persist we will begin by reading Of Grammatology [1967], in conjunction with some of the texts that Derrida addresses there, as well as three of Derrida’s seminal essays, ‘Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences,’ 'Plato's Pharmacy' and ‘Differance’.  We will then move on to a number of Derrida’s essays on literature, collected by Derek Attridge in Acts of Literature.  Please note that the reading schedule outlined here is provisional, since we will certainly want to adjust it and move at a quicker or slower pace through some of the material. Texts: The two texts we will study in greatest depth, Of Grammatology and Acts of Literature are available in the NYU bookstore.  (Students who can read French, however little, should consider consulting and possibly purchasing the French edition of Grammatology.)  I will provide all other reading, either on the class website or in xerox form. Course requirements: three short papers (4 pages each) and informed participation in class discussion – which is to say that CLASS MEMBERS MUST ARRIVE WITH THE READING, HAVING DONE THE READING, AND BEING READY TO DISCUSS THE READING. Note that students must come to each class unless they have incontrovertible reason for not doing so and that repeated failure to attend classes will affect your final grade.

ENGL-UA 761 | Irish Lit of 1930s & WWII

How did writers respond to and try to shape the world-shifting events of the 1930s and the Second World War? Does their writing reflect European and global troubles including a rise in fascism, economic collapse, uprisings and revolutions, and hostile invasions? When the Irish government declared neutrality during the Second World War — a period in Ireland known as “The Emergency” — how did writers and artists react? In a period of increasing censorship, did transnational writers respond in the same way to threats from outside their countries and threats from within?

In this class, we will consider the reactive and sometimes experimental work of “late modernists” in Ireland, England, and beyond. We will read work written about and in reaction to economic collapse, the Spanish Civil War, fascism, the blitz, and World War. In addition to poetry, short stories, novels and travel writing by Irish, British and European writers, we will also consider “open letters,” journalism, wartime propaganda, visual art and film.

ENGL-UA 780 | Intro to Postcolonial Studies:Post-Apartheid South African Literature

South Africa has always been a country that raises global questions.  The anti-apartheid struggle spawned an international movement that grappled with questions of race and justice.  The term apartheid itself has become a potent and portable sign to stigmatize extreme forms of oppression in different parts of the world.  South Africa hence offers an ideal site from which to approach key postcolonial questions.

This course will survey a range of media and genres: in addition to novels and poetry, we will examine photography and stand-up comedy.  The course will include at least two skype interviews with writers whom we will be studying.   

ENGL-UA 800.001 | Reading Poems, Romantic to Modern | Prof. Peter Nicholls

The course will engage in close readings of a series of poems from the late eighteenth- to the late-twentieth century. We shall explore questions relating to genre (epic, lyric, dramatic monologue) and historical context, but our main focus will be on the practice of close reading and recitation, looking in detail at a range of poetic devices—rhyme, rhythm, meter, apostrophe, sound and image, for example—so as to develop an understanding of the particular kinds of attention poems seem to demand. Students will be expected to read a relatively small number of poems across the semester, but that reading will be an intensive one both in private study and in seminar discussion. Poems may be chosen from the works of William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, William Butler Yeats, Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams, Langston Hughes, Lorine Niedecker, Wallace Stevens, Jean Toomer, W. H. Auden, Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O’Hara, Adrienne Rich, John Ashbery, Thom Gunn, Seamus Heaney, George Oppen, Derek Walcott, Denise Riley, and J. H. Prynne.

ENGL-UA 800.002 | Literature and Science: from Newton to the New Quantum Age

When Isaac Newton first connected falling apples to orbiting planets,  “Literature” referred to all types of writing” and “science” just meant “knowledge” (“nescience” meant “ignorance”). How, then, did we end up having to make a choice between them?  To major in one is to leave the other behind.  Our journey to understand how literature and science parted ways will have four primary stops: 1) the 17th-century revolution in knowledge in the words of Francis Bacon, Mary Cavendish, Isaac Newton, and Mary Astell; 2) the 18th-century takeoff in knowledge, featuring Watt’s steam engines, the formation of the novel, and the rise of lyric;  3) the 19th-century emergence of the modern disciplines and their partition into humanities/sciences/social sciences as embodied in Charles Darwin and Matthew Arnold; and 4) the 21st-century possibility of a new compatibility among the disciplines as they all remake themselves to face the same digital future.  

ENGL-UA 950 | Medieval Interiorities | Prof. Paul Strohm

Medieval literature might seem the last place to look for elaborations of inner or psychological life.  Nevertheless, many of our most central ideas about the mind and how it works--about consciousness, intention, desire, and responsibility--are medieval through and through.  This seminar will explore “the discovery of the mind” in medieval literature.  Works read in common will include Prudentius’s Psychomachia (in translation), Letters of Abelard and Heloise (in translation), the Middle English Romaunt of the Rose, Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde, the morality play Mankind, and several other tales and plays of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. We will end by revisiting the inner life of another literary character often trapped in thought, Shakespeare’s Hamlet.  Each member of the seminar will develop a personal research project, based either on one of these works or on other writing selected in conference with the instructor.  Several short papers, culminating in a longer and more developed research paper.

ENGL-UA 951 | Christopher Marlowe: Renaissance Atheist

In this seminar, we will read intensively through the complete dramatic works and major poetic works of Christopher Marlowe. Born in the same year as Shakespeare, Marlowe achieved great fame as a playwright in the years before Shakespeare himself began writing for the stage. But Marlowe was murdered before his thirtieth birthday, having completed only seven plays. Marlowe was known for much more than his drama, however, as he also a notorious spy for Elizabeth’s spymaster, Sir Francis Walsingham. In the months before his murder, Marlowe was accused of atheism and sodomy, and was awaiting trial on these accusations, which at the time were labeled as “heresy.” Since his untimely death, scholars have debated about whether Marlowe’s plays express covertly or overtly the atheism of which he was accused, as well as homosexual desire. In this course, we will return to the question of Marlowe’s atheism and other supposed crimes as a point of departure for a close examination of his work. The plays we will read are Dido, Queen of Carthage, Tamburlaine, Parts 1 and 2, The Jew of Malta, Doctor Faustus, Edward II, and The Massacre at Paris. The poems include “Hero and Leander,” selections from the translation of Ovid’s Amores and Lucan’s Pharsalia, as well as other lyrics.

ENGL-UA 952 | Topics in 17th C British Literature | Prof. Ernest Gilman

Poetry and prose  of the 17th century Principal readings in Donne,Jonson,  Bacon, Herbert, Hobbes,  Browne. Marvell, and Milton, with an emphasis on the scientific, political and spiritual crises of the early modern age in England.

ENGL-UA 963 | Black Poetry and Social Movement(s) | Prof. Posmentier

This course is an immersion in selections of black diasporic poetry from its 18th century beginnings to the present, including such writers as Phyllis Wheatley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Sterling Brown, Langston Hughes, Anne Spencer, Claude McKay, Aimé Cesaire, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, Kamau Brathwaite, M. NourbeSe Philip, Claudia Rankine, as well as the chants, leaflets, and manifestos and histories of a range of social movements from abolition to Black Lives Matter. Our semester will be organized around different types of movements and their implication for the development of black poetry as an aesthetic and social form in the US and the Caribbean. How have poets responded formally and ideologically to the radical geographic, cultural and linguistic displacements of the transatlantic slave trade from the 18th century to the present? How have poems circulated (orally and in print) through more recent migrations and immigrations around and across the Atlantic; and been shaped by cultural and social movements, like the Black Arts Movement and Caribbean Artists Movement of the 1960s and 1970s, or the Black Lives Matter movement of today? We will take special interest in the vitality of poetic communities, and so we will find occasions whenever possible to attend readings and performances or welcome visitors.

Students will learn about the literary history of black poetry in the United States and the Anglophone Caribbean, attune their eyes and ears to a range of aesthetic practices, and develop methodologies for reading and a vocabulary for writing about poetry. In addition, this class will guide students through the process of writing a literary research paper: identifying central scholarly questions, unearthing archival materials housed in libraries or online, formulating a research question and bibliography, exchanging ideas with fellow scholars, and making a persuasive written argument about poetry in its literary, cultural, and/or historical context. Through this process, students will have the opportunity to shape the class according to their own interests.

ENGL-UA 974 | Poetry and Poetics: Romanticisms/Modernisms/Now | Prof. McLane

"What is Poetry?" Asked Coleridge; asked Gertrude Stein; ask contemporary poets.  This course explores several poetic and theoretical genealogies: anchoring ourselves in British romanticism (circa 1800), we will explore as well the complex and ongoing conversation between poets and poetries typically designated "romantic,” "modernist," and “contemporary.”  We will pay special attention to genre (e.g. “lyric”) and to questions of experiment, hybridity, mediality.  Our primary readings will be in English in its many modalities and borderzones, including Scots and varieties of American English.  Questions of translation will recur and be welcome.  Among the poets, critics, theorists, and essayists we are likely to consider: romantics—Wordsworth, Shelley, Coleridge, Burns, Scott, Keats; modernists—Ezra Pound, H. D., William Carlos Williams, T. S. Eliot, Victor Segalen, Hugh MacDiarmid; contemporaries—possibilities include Claudia Rankine, Tom Pickard, Tyehimba Jess, Ann Lauterbach, Lisa Robertson, Inger Christensen. Other readings: ballads (traditional and literary), various manifesti, anthologies, and treatises, as well as literary criticism and theory on literary periodization, genre, and poetics. While not disregarding chronology, much less historicity, this class will proceed in part through juxtaposition—romantics and moderns and contemporaries read alongside one another most weeks, in order to blast us out of complacency.  

ENGL-UA 975 | Modern Asian Novel | Prof. Watson

How can we understand the emergence and development of modern Asian literature and, in particular, the novel form? Are there common experiences and literary strategies that come to define this vast genre? In this course, we tackle these questions by examining a small number of Asian and transpacific novels, spanning the early colonial period to the present, and ranging from colonial India, Cold War South Korea, to postcolonial Singapore and the Philippines. Our (necessarily selective) focus will be on literary articulations of modernity, colonialism, nationalism, migration, and the limits of the postcolonial nation-state. Texts not originally written in English will be read in translation.

We begin the course with two modern masterpieces: José Rizal’s Touch Me Not (1887), Rabindranath Tagore’s Home and the World (1916) which we will read in translation from the Spanish and Bengali. Reading alongside theories of nationalism, regionalism, anti-colonial resistance (Benedict Anderson, Gandhi), and other short stories of the period, we examine these texts for the way they grapple with the problematics of modernization, anti-colonial nationalism, social reform, and Westernization. While attentive to issues of translation, we will consider them for their narrative style and innovative literary forms.

In the next section of the course, we jump to literature of the post-independence, Cold War period of the 1970s-80s, with Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s classic This Earth of Mankind (1980) serving as our transition text. In particular, we examine novels that interrogate the limits of the independent postcolonial nation-state through problems of economic development, patriarchy, authoritarian rule, and Cold War violence. Further texts in this section include Ninotchka Rosca’s State of War (1980) and Salman Rushdie’s Shame (1983).  In the third and final section of the course, we read more recent literature that “looks back” to these Cold War decades with a longer view of colonial and postcolonial history, firmly linking such histories to our present moment: Gina Apostol’s Gun Dealers’ Daughter (2012); Han Kang’s Human Acts (2014); and Sonny Liew’s graphic novel The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye (2016). We end the course with Viet Thanh Nguyen’s Pulitzer Prize-winning rendering of the Vietnam War, The Sympathizer (2015).

ENGL-UA 995 | CLS LAB | Prof. Boggs

Course Overview: The purpose of this two (2) credit course is to bridge scholarly inquiry and professional training by providing students with an intensive introduction to the world of contemporary literature: its writers, its communities, and its professional organizations and institutions. It is built around the English Department’s Contemporary Literature Series (CLS), which brings noted authors who are on course syllabi that semester to the NYU campus (see www.nyu-cls.org). By facilitating student contact with authors , literary arts administrators, and others working in and on literary communities in New York City, CLS Lab prepares students to translate their interests and skills as English majors into the intellectual and professional contexts of the literary world in New York City and beyond. This semester's Lab will focus on the life and work of James Baldwin, and contemporary authors and artists writing about and/or influenced by him. The class will meet bi-weekly on Thursdays from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. and one of these meetings will be a field-trip. This course is open to all English majors and minors and the prerequisite is "ENGL-UA 200 Introduction to the Study of Literature" (formerly called "Literary Interpretation"). If you are interested in taking this course, please submit one paragraph about your interest in contemporary literature and/or James Baldwin HERE: https://goo.gl/forms/Cde499q11FZJcAIn1

As there are limited spots in this course, please submit your paragraph as soon as possible. For more information about CLS Lab you can attend Prof. Boggs' office hours, Thursdays from 2 to 4:30 pm.

ENGL-GA 1957 | Introduction to Marxism: Action and Event | Prof. John M. Archer

What strategies and questions do classic Marxist texts have to offer current concerns with effective political communication and action? What prehistories emerge when we look back at earlier encounters with the nation and national consciousness, cross-border social movements, mass strikes, decolonization, and black lives? How does radical action in the present operate in tension with the spontaneous event of revolution? After a brief review of Marx-Engels, the course will consider writings by four thinkers and activists in the Marxist path: Rosa Luxemburg, Georg Lukács, Antonio Gramsci, and Frantz Fanon. Along the way, we will also consider excerpts from key figures like Lenin and Benjamin, and shorter articles and chapters written over the past 25 years in response to ongoing matters in our main reading. Major concepts include spontaneism, hegemony, reification and the commodity form, class, alienation, and recognition. Although literature and culture in general will not form the core of our inquiry, many of the principal authors, as well as some supplementary readings, reflect on myth, epic, drama, the novel, popular literature, electronic media, and language itself, between action and event.

In addition to brief articles, books include: Marx-Engels, The German Ideology; Luxemburg, The National Question;  Lukács, History and Class Consciousness and The Historical Novel; Gramsci, The Prison Notebooks; and Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks and The Wretched of the Earth. Supplementary readings include Stuart Hall, Judith Butler, and Slavoj Žižek. Assignments consist of brief papers and responses as well as a substantial final essay.

If you are an undergraduate junior or senior English major and wish to take this course, contact the instructor:  john.archer@nyu.edu.

Summer 2017 Courses

Course No.

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Size

Session

CORE COURSES

ENGL-UA 210

British Literature I

Yoder, Laura

TWR

11:40 AM-1:50 PM

20

First

ENGL-UA 220

British Literature II

Menon, Tara

MTR

1:15-3:25PM

20

Second

ENGL-UA 230

American Literature I

Anderson, Tim

MTW

9:15-11:25 AM

20

First

CRITICAL THEORY

ENGL-UA 712

Major Texts

Franklin, Jonathan

MTW

3:30-5:40 PM

20

Second

ENGL-UA 800.001

Literature of the Environment

Abatiell, Pat

TWR

12:30-2:40PM

20

Second

PRE-1800

ENGL-UA 310

Horror and the Middles Ages

Dominick, Gina

MTW

1:00-3:10 PM

20

Second

ADVANCED ELECTIVES

ENGL-UA 240

American Short Story

Kotecha, Shiv

TWR

5:15-7:25 PM

20

Second

ENGL-UA 530

English Novel in the 19th C

Sridharan, Vignesh

TWR

12:30-2:40 PM

20

First

ENGL-UA 170

Film as Literature

Sandhu, Sukhdev

TWR

2:00-4:00PM

20

First