Core Graduate Faculty

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Yusef Komunyakaa's numerous books of poems include Pleasure Dome: New & Collected Poems, 1975-1999; Talking Dirty to the Gods; Thieves of Paradise, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Award; Neon Vernacular: New & Selected Poems 1977-1989, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize and the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award; Magic City; Dien Cai Dau, which won the Dark Room Poetry Prize; I Apologize for the Eyes in My Head, winner of the San Francisco Poetry Center Award; Copacetic; and most recently, The Emperor of Water Clocks. Komunyakaa's prose is collected in Blue Notes: Essays, Interviews & Commentaries. He also co-edited The Jazz Poetry Anthology and co-translated The Insomnia of Fire by Nguyen Quang Thieu. His honors include the William Faulkner Prize from the Universite Rennes, the Thomas Forcade Award, the Hanes Poetry Prize, fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Louisiana Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Bronze Star for his service in Vietnam, where he served as a correspondent and managing editor of the Southern Cross. In 1999, he was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. Yusef Komunyakaa is a senior faculty member in the NYU Creative Writing Program.

Sharon Olds is a previous director of the Creative Writing Program at NYU. Her first book of poetry, Satan Says, received the San Francisco Poetry Center Award. Her second book, The Dead and the Living, was both the Lamont Poetry Selection for 1983 and the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award. She is also the author of The Gold Cell; The Father; The Wellspring; Blood, Tin, Straw; The Unswept Room; Strike Sparks: Selected Poems, 1980- 2002; One Secret Thing; and most recently, Odes. In 2012 her collection Stag's Leap was awarded the T.S. Eliot Prize and the Pulitzer Prize. She received a Lila Wallace-Readers' Digest Grant in 1993, part of which was designated for the NYU workshop program at Goldwater Hospital on Roosevelt Island. In 1997, she received the Harriet Monroe Poetry Award. From 1998-2000 she was the New York State Poet Laureate. Professor Olds holds the Erich Maria Remarque Professorship at NYU.

Zadie Smith was born in north-west London in 1975. Her first novel, White Teeth, was the winner of The Whitbread First Novel Award, The Guardian First Book Award, The James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction, and The Commonwealth Writers' First Book Award. Her second novel, The Autograph Man, won The Jewish Quarterly Wingate Literary Prize. Zadie Smith's third novel, On Beauty, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, and won The Commonwealth Writers' Best Book Award (Eurasia Section) and the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her most recent novel, Swing Time, was published earlier this year. She is the editor of an anthology of short stories entitled The Book Of Other People. Her collection of essays Changing My Mind was published in November 2009, and she was formerly the New Books columnist for Harper's Magazine. Zadie Smith is a graduate of Cambridge University and has taught at Harvard and Columbia universities. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

Jonathan Safran Foer is the author of the bestselling novels Everything Is Illuminated, named Book of the Year by the Los Angeles Times and the winner of numerous awards, including the Guardian First Book Prize, the National Jewish Book Award, and the New York Public Library Young Lions Prize. His novels also include Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, most recently I Am Here, and a book of non-fiction Eating Animals. Foer was one of Rolling Stone's "People of the Year" and Esquire's "Best and Brightest." Foer was also included in The New Yorker magazine's "20 Under 40" list of writers. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Nathan Englander is the author of the collection What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank as well as the internationally bestselling story collection For the Relief of Unbearable Urges, and the novel The Ministry of Special Cases (all published by Knopf/Vintage). His short fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, and The Washington Post, as well as The O. Henry Prize Stories and numerous editions of The Best American Short Stories. Translated into more than a dozen languages, Englander was selected as one of “20 Writers for the 21st Century” by The New Yorker, received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a PEN/Malamud Award, the Bard Fiction Prize, and the Sue Kaufman Prize from the American Academy of Arts & Letters. He’s been a fellow at the Dorothy & Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, and at The American Academy of Berlin. In 2012, Englander's play The Twenty-Seventh Man premiered at The Public Theater, and his translation New American Haggadah (edited by Jonathan Safran Foer) was published by Little, Brown. He also co-translated Etgar Keret's Suddenly, A Knock at the Door, which appeared from FSG in 2012. He lives in Brooklyn, New York and Madison, Wisconsin.

Joyce Carol Oates is a recipient of the National Book Award and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction. She has written some of the most enduring fiction of our time, including the national bestsellers We Were the Mulvaneys and Blonde (a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize), and the New York Times bestseller The Falls (winner of the 2005 Prix Femina Etranger) The Gravedigger's Daughter, and Lovely, Dark, Deep: Stories, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University and has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters since 1978. She is the recipient of many distinguished awards including the Common Wealth Award for Distinguished Service in Literature, The Kenyon Review Award for Literary Achievement, the Chicago Tribune Lifetime Achievement Award, and The Norman Mailer Prize for Lifetime Achievement. In 2013, she received the Bram Stoker Award for Best Fiction Collection for Black Dahlia and White Swan.

Anne Carson is an internationally acclaimed writer. Her books include Antigonick, Nox, Decreation, The Beauty of the Husband: A Fictional Essay in 29 Tangos, winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize for Poetry; Economy of the Unlost; Autobiography of Red, shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the T.S. Eliot Prize, Plainwater: Essays and Poetry, Glass, Irony and God, shortlisted for the Forward Prize, and most recently, Float. Carson is also a classics scholar, the translator of If Not, Winter: Fragments of Sappho, and the author of Eros the Bittersweet. Her awards and honors include the Lannan Award, the Pushcart Prize, the Griffin Trust Award for Excellence in Poetry, a Guggenheim fellowship, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Her latest book, Red Doc>, was shortlisted for the 2013 T.S. Elliot Prize.

Terrance Hayes is the author of How to Be Drawn (Penguin, 2015), a National Book Award finalist, and Lighthead (2010), winner of the 2010 National Book Award and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other books are Wind In a Box (Penguin, 2006), Hip Logic (Penguin, 2002), and Muscular Music (Tia Chucha Press, 1999). His honors include a Whiting Writers Award, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a United States Artists Zell Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a MacArthur Fellowship. How To Be Drawn (Penguin, 2015), his most recent collection of poems, was a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award, the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award, and received the 2016 NAACP Image Award for Poetry.

Edward Hirsch has received numerous awards and fellowships, including a MacArthur Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Ingram Merrill Foundation Award, a Pablo Neruda Presidential Medal of Honor, the Prix de Rome, and an Academy of Arts and Letters Award. In 2008, he was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. His first collection of poems, For the Sleepwalkers (1981), received the Delmore Schwartz Memorial Award from New York University and the Lavan Younger Poets Award from the Academy of American Poets. His second collection, Wild Gratitude (1986), won the National Book Critics Circles Award. Since then, he has published six additional books of poems: The Night Parade (1989), Earthly Measures (1994), On Love (1998), Lay Back the Darkness (2003), Special Orders (2008), and The Living Fire: New and Selected Poems (2010). Gabriel: A Poem (2014), which was longlisted for the National Book Award. He lives in Brooklyn, New York. 

Deborah Landau is the author of three collections of poetry: The Uses of the Body and The Last Usable Hour, both Lannan Literary Selections from Copper Canyon Press, and Orchidelirium, selected by Naomi Shihab Nye for the Robert Dana Anhinga Prize for Poetry. Her other awards include a Jacob K Javits Fellowship from the US Department of Education and a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship.

The Uses of the Body was featured on NPR's All Things Considered, and included on "Best of 2015" lists by The New Yorker, Vogue, BuzzFeed, and O, The Oprah Magazine, among others. A Spanish edition is forthcoming from Valparaiso Ediciones.

Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Tin House, Poetry, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times, selected for The Best American Poetry, and included in anthologies such as Please Excuse This Poem: 100 New Poets for the Next Generation, Not for Mothers Only, The Best American Erotic Poems, and Women's Work: Modern Poets Writing in English.

Landau was educated at Stanford University, Columbia University, and Brown University, where she was a Javits Fellow and received a Ph.D. in English and American Literature. She teaches in and directs the Creative Writing Program at New York University, and lives in Brooklyn with her husband, sons, and daughter.

Profile photograph by Sarah Shatz

Website:

www.deborahlandau.net

Catherine Barnett is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writers Award, the Glasgow Prize for Emerging Writers, and a Pushcart Prize. Her most recent book, The Game of Boxes, published by Graywolf Press in 2012, won the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets for an outstanding second book. She is also the author of Into Perfect Spheres Such Holes Are Pierced, which received the Beatrice Hawley Award and was published in 2004 by Alice James Books. Barnett has taught at Barnard, the New School, and NYU, where she was honored with an Outstanding Service Award.

Darin Strauss is the internationally bestselling author of the novels Chang and Eng, The Real McCoy, and More Than it Hurts You, and most recently a memoir Half a Life. A recipient of a National Book Critics Circle Award, the Guggenheim Fellowship, an American Library Association Award, and numerous other prizes, Strauss has written screenplays for Disney, Gary Oldman, and Julie Taymor, and currently has a production deal with Sony Pictures Television. He is a Clinical Professor of Fiction at NYU's creative writing program. His work has been translated into fourteen languages and published in nineteen countries. Having recently finished a short stint as an opinion columnist at Al-Jazeera America, Strauss is beginning a recurring column about faith for Salon.

Matthew Rohrer is the author of A Hummock in the Malookas, Satellite, A Green Light, Rise Up, A Plate of Chicken, Surrounded by Friends, and Destroyer and Preserver. With Joshua Beckman he wrote Nice Hat. Thanks. and recorded the audio CD Adventures While Preaching the Gospel of Beauty. With Joshua Beckman and Anthony McCann he wrote the secret book Gentle Reader! It is not for sale. Octopus Books published his action/adventure chapbook-length poem They All Seemed Asleep in 2008.


His poems have been widely anthologized and have appeared in many journals. He's received the Hopwood Award for poetry and a Pushcart prize, and was selected as a National Poetry Series winner, and was shortlisted for the Griffin International Poetry Prize. Recently he has participated in residencies/ performances at the Museum of Modern Art (New York City) and the Henry Art Gallery (Seattle).


Matthew Rohrer was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, was raised in Oklahoma, and attended universities in Ann Arbor, Dublin, and Iowa City. He teaches in the Creative Writing Program at NYU and lives in Brooklyn.

Visiting Graduate Faculty

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Emily Barton is the author of the novels The Book of Esther, Brookland, and The Testament of Yves Gundron, as well as scores of essays and reviews. She has won a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, an artist’s grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Bard Fiction Prize.

Susan Choi is the author of The Foreign Student, winner the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, American Woman, finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize, and A Person of Interest, named finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. She is a recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, and was named the inaugural recipient of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award in 2010. She currently lives in Brooklyn with her family.

John Freeman, writer and literary critic, was the editor of the literary magazine Granta until 2013, as well as the former president of the National Book Critics Circle. He is an executive editor at the Literary Hub. His writing has appeared in almost 200 English-language publications around the world, including The New York Times Book Review, the Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, and The Wall Street Journal. He is the author of The Tyranny of E-mail: The Four-Thousand-Year Journey to Your Inbox (Scribner, 2009), and, most recently, How to Read a Novelist (FSG, 2013). He is the founding editor of Freeman's, a new biannual literary journal.

Major Jackson is the author of four collections of poetry, including Roll Deep (Norton: 2015), which won the 2016 Vermont Book Award and was hailed in the New York Times Book Review as "a remixed odyssey." His other volumes include Holding Company (Norton: 2010), Hoops (Norton: 2006), and Leaving Saturn (University of Georgia: 2002), which won the Cave Canem Poetry Prize and was a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award. Jackson has published poems and essays in American Poetry ReviewCallalooThe New Yorker, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, Tin House, and in several volumes of Best American Poetry. He is the recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize, the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, among other honors. Jackson has served as a Distinguished Visiting Writer at Adelphi University, a creative arts fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, and the Sidney Harman Writer in-Residence at Baruch College. He serves as the Poetry Editor of The Harvard Review.

Katie Kitamura is the author of Gone to the Forest and The Longshot, both of which were finalists for the New York Public Library's Young Lions Fiction Award. The Longshot is currently being developed into a feature film. Katie has written for numerous publications including The New York Times, The Guardian, Granta, and Wired, and is a regular contributor to Frieze.

Hari Kunzru  (Fiction) Born in London, Hari Kunzru is the author of the novels The Impressionist, Transmission, My Revolutions, and Gods Without Men, as well as a short story collection, Noise, and a novella, Memory Palace. His novel White Tears will be published in Spring 2017. He was a 2008 Cullman Fellow at the New York Public Library, a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow, and a 2016 Fellow of the American Academy in Berlin. He lives in New York City.

David Lipsky is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine. His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's magazine, The Best American Short Stories, The Best American Magazine Writing, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, and many other publications. He contributes as an essayist to NPR's All Things Considered, he's taught at Deerfield and Johns Hopkins, and is the recipient of a Lambert Fellowship, a Media Award from GLAAD, and a National Magazine Award. He's the author of the novel The Art Fair, a collection of stories, Three Thousand Dollars, the best-selling nonfiction book, Absolutely American, which was a Time magazine Best Book of the Year, and most recently Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip With David Foster Wallace, which was a New York Times bestseller and an NPR Best Book of the Year.

Meghan O'Rourke is the author of the memoir The Long Goodbye (Riverhead, 2011) as well as the poetry collections Once (2011) and Halflife (2007), which was a finalist for both the Patterson Poetry Prize and Britain's Forward First Book Prize. She was awarded a 2014 Guggenheim Fellowship, the Radcliffe Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and a Front Page Award for her cultural criticism, among other prizes. She is the poetry editor of T Magazine for formerly an editor at The New Yorker, Slate, and The Paris Review. Her essays and poems have appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, Atlantic Monthly, The Kenyon Review, Best American Poetry, and more. A graduate of Yale University, she teaches at Princeton and the Creative Writing Program at New York University. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Undergraduate Faculty

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Catherine Barnett is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writers Award, the Glasgow Prize for Emerging Writers, and a Pushcart Prize. Her most recent book, The Game of Boxes, published by Graywolf Press in 2012, won the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets for an outstanding second book. She is also the author of Into Perfect Spheres Such Holes Are Pierced, which received the Beatrice Hawley Award and was published in 2004 by Alice James Books. Barnett has taught at Barnard, the New School, and NYU, where she was honored with an Outstanding Service Award.

Marie-Helene Bertino is the author of 2 A.M. at The Cat's Pajamas (Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers, Best Book of 2014 at NPR and others) and Safe as Houses (Iowa Award for Short Fiction, named Outstanding Collection by The Story Prize). Her work has received The Pushcart Prize, The O. Henry award, and fellowships from MacDowell, Sewanee, and Hedgebrook Writers Colony. In addition to teaching at NYU, she is a faculty member of the low-residency MFA program at Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), and lives in Brooklyn, where she is an Editor-at-Large for Catapult Magazine. For more information, please visit: www.mariehelenebertino.com.

Marcelle Clements is a novelist, essayist, and journalist. Her fourth and most recent book is a novel, Midsummer. She has written prizewinning essays and articles for numerous publications, including the New York Times, Esquire, Elle, and Rolling Stone.  Since 1999, she has taught a seminar on Proust's In Search of Lost Time at NYU's College of Arts and Science, where she is a Collegiate Professor. She is a recipient of NYU's Golden Dozen Teaching Award.

Leopoldine Core was born and raised in New York’s East Village and graduated from Hunter College. She is the author of the poetry collection Veronica Bench and the short story collection When Watched, which was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award. Her fiction and poetry have appeared in Joyland, Open City, PEN America and Apology Magazine, among others. She is the recipient of a 2015 Whiting Award for fiction, as well as fellowships from The Center for Fiction and The Fine Arts Work Center. She lives in New York.

Elaine Equi's latest book is Sentences and Rain from Coffee House Press. Her other collections include Click and Clone, Ripple Effect: New and Selected Poems, The Cloud of Knowable Things, Surface Tension, Decoy, and Voice-Over, which won the San Francisco State Poetry Award. Her work is widely anthologized and appears in many editions of the Best American Poetry. In addition to NYU, she teaches in the M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing at The New School.

Miranda Field was born and raised in London, England. Her first book, Swallow, won a Katharine Bakeless Nason Literary Publication Award in Poetry, and she has also received a "Discovery"/The Nation Award, a Pushcart Prize, and a Teaching Fellowship at Bread Loaf. Her poems and essays appear in numerous journals, magazines, and anthologies. Her forthcoming book, Imaginary Royalty, is set to release in 2017. She lives in New York City with poet Tom Thompson and their two children, and teaches creative writing at The New School.

Robert Fitterman is the author of 10 books of poetry including: The Sun Also Also Rises, war the musical, Metropolis XXX: The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Edge Books), Metropolis 16-29 (Coach House Press), Metropolis 1-15 (Sun & Moon Press), This Window Makes Me Feel (www.ubu.com).  Metropolis 1-15 was awarded the Sun & Moon “New American Poetry Award (2000)” and Metropolis 16-29 was awarded the Small Press Traffic “Book of the Year Award (2003)”.  With novelist Rodrigo Rey Rosa, he co-authored the film What Sebastian Dreamt which was selected for the Sundance Film Festival (2004) and the Lincoln Center LatinBeat Festival (2004). He has been a full-time faculty member in NYU’s Liberal Studies Program since 1993. He also teaches poetry at the Milton Avery School of Graduate Studies at Bard College.

Adam Fitzgerald is the author of the poetry collections The Late Parade (2013) and George Washington (2016). The founding editor of poetry journal Maggy, he is currently a contributing editor for Literary Hub where he regularly features and interviews contemporary poets.

George Michelsen Foy is a novelist and non-fiction writer whose books and articles have been published by Viking Penguin, Bantam Doubleday, Harper's Magazine, University Press of New England, Journal of Microliterature, The New York Times and Rolling Stone, among others. He is a founding member of the FlashPoint-NYC short-fiction/ jazz/ performance collective.

Elizabeth Gaffney is the author of two novels, Metropolis and When the World Was Young (forthcoming in July 2014 from Random House), and many short stories. She has also translated three books from German. She worked for sixteen years as an editor at The Paris Review and now serves as editor-at-large of A Public Space.

Jean Gallagher is the author of This Minute (winner of the Poets Out Loud Prize from Fordham University Press), Stubborn (winner of the FIELD Prize from Oberlin College Press), and Start (Oberlin College Press). She is a Professor of English at the Polytechnic Institute of NYU and lives in Manhattan with her husband and daughter.

Ann Hood is the author of eight novels, most recently, The Knitting Circle. She has also written a memoir, a book on the craft of writing, and a collection of short stories. Ann has won a Best American Spiritual Writing Award, the Paul Bowles Prize for Short Fiction, and two Pushcart Prizes.

Mira Jacob is the author of the novel The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing (Random House). She is the co-founder of the much-loved Pete’s Reading Series in Brooklyn, where she spent 13 years bringing literary fiction, non-fiction, and poetry to the city’s sweetest stage. Previously, she directed editorial content for various websites, co-authored shoe impresario Kenneth Cole’s autobiography, and wrote VH-1’s Pop-Up Video. Her writing has been published in books, magazines, on television, and across the web. She has appeared on national and local television and radio, and has taught writing to students of all ages in New York, New Mexico, and Barcelona.

Maria Laurino is the author of The Italian Americans: A History (December 2014), the companion to a forthcoming PBS documentary series, as well as the memoirs Old World Daughter, New World Mother and the national bestseller Were You Always an Italian? (all published by W.W. Norton).  In addition to teaching at NYU, Laurino serves as Assistant to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo.  She was the former chief speechwriter for NYC Mayor David Dinkins and a staff writer for the Village Voice.  Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Nation, Salon.com, and numerous publications.  Laurino's essays have been widely anthologized, including in the Norton Reader.

Rickey Laurentiis is the author of Boy with Thorn, winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize and the Levis Reading Prize, and a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery award. His poetry has been supported by several foundations and fellowships, including the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Italy (2014), Poetry International Rotterdam (2014), the National Endowment for the Arts (2013), Cave Canem Foundation (2009-2011), and the Poetry Foundation. Individual poems have appeared widely, including  Boston Review, Feminist Studies, The Kenyon Review, The Los Angeles Review of Books Quarterly, among others.

Sharon Mesmer's fiction collections are Ma Vie à Yonago (in French translation from Hachette Littératures, 2005), In Ordinary Time and The Empty Quarter (Hanging Loose 2005 and 2000). An excerpt of her story "Revenge" appeared in the just-released anthology I'll Drown My Book: Conceptual Writing by Women (Les Figues). Poetry collections are The Virgin Formica (Hanging Loose, 2008) and Annoying Diabetic Bitch (Combo Books, 2008); previous collections are Half Angel, Half Lunch (Hard Press, 1998) and the chapbooks Vertigo Seeks Affinities (Belladonna Books, 2006) and Crossing Second Avenue (ABJ Books, Tokyo, 1997). She has had print work in Poetry, New American Writing, Women's Studies Quarterly, West Wind Review, Abraham Lincoln and online work on the sites esque, The Wall Street Journal, Poets for Living Waters, and The Scream. A selection of her flarf poetry will appear in the forthcoming Postmodern American Poetry — A Norton Anthology. From 2003-2006 her column, “Seasonal Affect,” appeared in the French fashion magazine Purple; currently her music and book reviews can be found in The Brooklyn Rail. Her awards include a 2010 Fulbright Specialist grant, a 2009 Jerome Foundation/SASE grant (as co-recipient/mentor, with poet Elisabeth Workman, grantee), two New York Foundation for the Arts fellowships (2007 and 1999), and the 1990 MacArthur Scholarship given through the Brooklyn College MFA poetry program by nomination of Allen Ginsberg.

Angelo Nikolopoulos is the author of Obscenely Yours (Alice James Books, 2013), winner of the Kinereth Gensler Award and finalist for a 2014 Lambda Literary Award. His poems have appeared in Best American Poetry 2012, Best New Poets 2011, Boston Review, Fence, The Los Angeles Review, Tin House, and elsewhere. He is a winner of the 2011 "Discovery" / Boston Review Poetry Contest and the founder of the White Swallow Reading Series in Manhattan. He also teaches at Rutgers University, New Brunswick.

Geoffrey Nutter is the author of four books of poems: The Rose of January, Christopher Sunset, Water's Leaves & Other Poems, and Summer Evening. His poems have appeared in journals and anthologies such as Carnet de Route, Verse, Denver Quarterly, Chicago Review, Fence, Xantippe, Best American Poetry 1997, and Iowa Anthology of New American Poetry. He is the recipient of an Academy of American Poets prize.

Meghan O'Rourke is the author of the memoir The Long Goodbye (Riverhead, 2011) as well as the poetry collections Once (2011) and Halflife (2007), which was a finalist for both the Patterson Poetry Prize and Britain's Forward First Book Prize. She was awarded a 2014 Guggenheim Fellowship, the Radcliffe Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and a Front Page Award for her cultural criticism, among other prizes. She is the poetry editor of T Magazine for formerly an editor at The New Yorker, Slate, and The Paris Review. Her essays and poems have appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, Atlantic Monthly, The Kenyon Review, Best American Poetry, and more. A graduate of Yale University, she teaches at Princeton and the Creative Writing Program at New York University. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Julia Pierpont is the author of the bestselling novel Among the Ten Thousand Things (Random House, 2015). For years she worked in the editorial department of The New Yorker and has been a contributor to that magazine, the New York Times Book Review, and the Guardian, among others. She received her MFA from NYU, where she was a Rona Jaffe Graduate Fellow.

Matthew Rohrer is the author of A Hummock in the Malookas, Satellite, A Green Light, Rise Up, A Plate of Chicken, Surrounded by Friends, and Destroyer and Preserver. With Joshua Beckman he wrote Nice Hat. Thanks. and recorded the audio CD Adventures While Preaching the Gospel of Beauty. With Joshua Beckman and Anthony McCann he wrote the secret book Gentle Reader! It is not for sale. Octopus Books published his action/adventure chapbook-length poem They All Seemed Asleep in 2008.


His poems have been widely anthologized and have appeared in many journals. He's received the Hopwood Award for poetry and a Pushcart prize, and was selected as a National Poetry Series winner, and was shortlisted for the Griffin International Poetry Prize. Recently he has participated in residencies/ performances at the Museum of Modern Art (New York City) and the Henry Art Gallery (Seattle).


Matthew Rohrer was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, was raised in Oklahoma, and attended universities in Ann Arbor, Dublin, and Iowa City. He teaches in the Creative Writing Program at NYU and lives in Brooklyn.

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh is the author, most recently, of the short story collection Brief Encounters With the Enemy, and the critically acclaimed memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free, for which he received a Whiting Writers' Award. It was selected as one of the ten best books of the year by Dwight Garner of The New York Times. His short stories and personal essays have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Granta, McSweeney's, The New York Times and The Best American Nonrequired Reading, among other publications. He was the recipient of a fiction fellowship from the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, and a NYU 2013 Outstanding Teaching Award. He is the spring '14 Warren Adler Visiting Writer at NYU.

Zadie Smith was born in north-west London in 1975. Her first novel, White Teeth, was the winner of The Whitbread First Novel Award, The Guardian First Book Award, The James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction, and The Commonwealth Writers' First Book Award. Her second novel, The Autograph Man, won The Jewish Quarterly Wingate Literary Prize. Zadie Smith's third novel, On Beauty, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, and won The Commonwealth Writers' Best Book Award (Eurasia Section) and the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her most recent novel, Swing Time, was published earlier this year. She is the editor of an anthology of short stories entitled The Book Of Other People. Her collection of essays Changing My Mind was published in November 2009, and she was formerly the New Books columnist for Harper's Magazine. Zadie Smith is a graduate of Cambridge University and has taught at Harvard and Columbia universities. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

Irini Spanidou is the author of three highly acclaimed novels: Fear, God’s Snake, and, most recently, Before. She has taught creative writing at New York University, Sarah Lawrence College and Brooklyn College. Her work has been translated into several languages, including her native Greek

Darin Strauss is the internationally bestselling author of the novels Chang and Eng, The Real McCoy, and More Than it Hurts You, and most recently a memoir Half a Life. A recipient of a National Book Critics Circle Award, the Guggenheim Fellowship, an American Library Association Award, and numerous other prizes, Strauss has written screenplays for Disney, Gary Oldman, and Julie Taymor, and currently has a production deal with Sony Pictures Television. He is a Clinical Professor of Fiction at NYU's creative writing program. His work has been translated into fourteen languages and published in nineteen countries. Having recently finished a short stint as an opinion columnist at Al-Jazeera America, Strauss is beginning a recurring column about faith for Salon.

Charles Taylor has written on movies, books, popular culture and politics for a variety of publications including The New York Times, Salon.com, The Los Angeles Times, Newsday, Dissent, The Nation, The New Yorker, The New York Observer, Lapham's Quarterly and others. A member of the National Society of Film Critics, Taylor has contributed to several of the Society's volumes, and his work appears in Best Music Writing 2009. He has taught journalism and literature courses at the New School and the Columbia School of Journalism.

Craig Morgan Teicher is the author of Brenda Is In The Room And Other Poems (Center for Literary Publishing, 2007), chosen by Paul Hoover as winner of the 2007 Colorado Prize for Poetry; a collection of short stories and fables called Cradle Book (BOA Editions, 2010); To Keep Love Blurry: Poems (BOA Edtions, 2012); and the chapbook Ambivalence and Other Conundrums (Omnidawn, 2014). His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in many publications, including The New Yorker, The Nation, The Best American Poetry 2009, The Paris Review, and The Yale Review. He is Director of Digital Operations and Poetry Reviews Editor of Publishers Weekly, a poetry editor of The Literary Review, a contributing editor of Pleiades, and has served as a Vice President of the National Book Critics Circle. 

Clifford Thompson received a Whiting Writers' Award for nonfiction in 2013 for Love for Sale and Other Essays, published by Autumn House Press-- which will publish his memoir, Twin of Blackness, in 2015. His essays on books, film, jazz, and American identity have appeared in publications including The Threepenny Review, The Iowa Review, Commonweal, Film Quarterly, Cineaste, Oxford American, and Black Issues Book Review. For over a dozen years he served as the editor of Current Biography.

Maria Venegas is the author of Bulletproof Vest, which was published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in 2014. Her short stories and essays have appeared in Granta, The Guardian, New York Magazine, and Ploughshares. She has also written for The New York Times Book Review. She lives in Brooklyn.

Chuck Wachtel is the author of the novels Joe The Engineer, winner of the Pen/Ernest Hemingway Citation, The Gates, and 3/03, as well as a collection of stories and novellas: Because We Are Here.  He has also published five collections of poems and short prose including The Coriolis Effect, and, most recently, What happens to Me.  He has received grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts in both poetry and fiction, and in Spring, 2011, 3/03 received the Mary Shelley Award for Outstanding Fictional Work. His short fiction, poems, essays and translations have appeared in numerous anthologies and periodicals both here and abroad.

Joanna Yas was the editor of Open City Magazine & Books for over a decade. She is editor-in-chief of Washington Square Review and executive editor of West 10th, and is on the editorial board of The Literary Review. She previously held positions at Ploughshares, Grand Street, and Zoetrope: All-Story. She is a co-founder of Editrixie, an editorial services company, and co-editor of the anthology They're at It Again: Twenty Years of Open City. Joanna is Readings & Special Programs Manager at the NYU Creative Writing Program, where she teaches, co-curates the reading series, and directs Writers in New York, the summer writing program. 

Rachel Zucker is the author of nine books, most recently, MOTHERs, a memoir, and The Pedestrians, a double collection of prose and poetry. Her fourth collection of poems, Museum of Accidents (2009), was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and she was awarded an NEA fellowship in 2013. Along with poet Arielle Greenberg, Zucker co-wrote Home/Birth: a poemic and co-edited two anthologies: Starting Today: 100 Poems for Obama's First 100 Days and Women Poets on Mentorship: Efforts and Affections. Zucker is currently writing a series of lectures as part of the Bagley Wright Lecture Series.