Slavery, Colonialism & Revolution in The Caribb

This course explores major themes and debates of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Caribbean history: slavery, capitalism, and emancipation; colonialism, empire, and revolution; and nationalism and race. Themes will be studied from a variety of approaches and perspectives: from very local micro-historical studies, to comparative ones, to more sweeping global treatments. Throughout we will attempt to bridge the vertical lines that often separate the study of the different linguistic and imperial Caribbean. We will also consider different frameworks for the study of the Caribbean, from traditional area studies, hemispheric studies, transnational US history, African Diaspora and Atlantic World.

Introduction to the major themes and debates of colonial Caribbean history. Begins with the reading of general works on the Caribbean: selections from major texts and classic essays by historians, anthropologists, and literary critics arguing the case for the study of the Caribbean as a unit of analysis. From there, goes on to consider the central themes of the region and the period: slavery, capitalism, and emancipation; colonialism, revolution, and imperialism; nationalism and race. Themes are studied from a variety of approaches and perspectives, from very local microhistorical studies to comparative ones to more sweeping global treatments. Throughout, an attempt is mIntroduction to the major themes and debates of colonial Caribbean history. Begins with the reading of general works on the Caribbean: selections from major texts and classic essays by historians, anthropologists, and literary critics arguing the case for the study of the Caribbean as a unit of analysis. From there, goes on to consider the central themes of the region and the period: slavery, capitalism, and emancipation; colonialism, revolution, and imperialism; nationalism and race. Themes are studied from a variety of approaches and perspectives, from very local microhistorical studies to comparative ones to more sweeping global treatments. Throughout, an attempt is made to bridge the vertical lines that often separate the study of the different linguistic and imperial Caribbeans.

Course Information

HIST-GA1809

Graduate

4 Points

Term Section Instructor Schedule Location

Fall 2017

1
Ada Ferrer
T: 9:30 AM - 12:15 PM KJCC 701