Undergraduate Courses Spring 2017

CLASS-UA 2 Intensive Elementary Latin, M-F, 8:00 - 9:15, Instructor TBA
Introduction to the essentials of Latin vocabulary, morphology, and syntax.  Open to students with no previous training in Latin. Completes the equivalent of a year's elementary level in one semester.

CLASS-UA 4 Elementary Latin 
001: M-TH, 9:30 - 1045, Christopher Parmenter
002: M-TH, 3:30 - 4:45, Celia Campbell

Continuation of Elementary Latin I. Introduction to the essentials of Latin vocabulary, morphology, and syntax.  Five hours of instruction weekly, with both oral and written drills and an emphasis on the ability to read Latin rather than merely translate it.

CLASS-UA 6 Intermediate Latin
001: M,T,TH, 9:30 - 10:45, Nicholas Rynearson
002: M,T,W, 3:30 - 4:45, Emilia Barbiero   
Intermediate Latin II: Virgil: Writings of the greatest Roman poet, focusing on the most generally read portions of his most celebrated poem, the Aeneid. The meter of the poem is studied, and the student learns to read Latin metrically to reflect the necessary sound for full appreciation of the writing. Readings in political and literary history illustrate the setting in the Augustan Age in which the Aeneid was written and enjoyed, the relationship of the poem to the other classical epics, and its influence on the poetry of later times.

CLASS-UA 8 Elementary Greek II, M-TH, 11:00 - 12:15, Laura Viidebaum 
Introduction to the complex but highly beautiful language of ancient Greece--the language of Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides, and Plato. Students learn the essentials of ancient Greek vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. Five hours of instruction weekly, with both oral and written drills and an emphasis on the ability to read Greek rather than merely translate it.

CLASS-UA 10 Intermediate Ancient Greek II: Homer, M,T,W, 9:30 - 10:45, Anne Carson

Prerequisite: V27.0009 or equivalent.
 
Extensive readings from the Iliad or Odyssey. Proficiency in Homeric grammar is expected, as well as a good command of Homeric vocabulary; the course will also address scansion and metre in Homeric epic. Relevant topics ranging from the problems of oral tradition to questions of heroism, divine intervention and 'Homeric Society' in Dark and Iron Age Greece will be discussed in class or developed by the student through oral or written reports.

CLASS-UA 242, identical to HIST-UA 200, HEL-UA242 Greek History from the Bronze Age to Alexander, T&TH, 2:00 - 3:15, Andrew Monson
Until a few decades ago, Greek history began with Homer and dealt narrowly with the Greek world. Thanks to archaeology, the social sciences, and other historical tools, the chronological and geographical horizons have been pushed back. The history of the Greeks now starts in the third millennium B.C. and is connected to the civilization that lay to the east, rooted in Egypt and Mesopotamia. This course traces Greek history from the Greeks’ earliest appearance to the advent of Alexander.

CLASS-UA 291, identical to HRBJD-UA 422 Living a Good Life: Greek and Jewish Perspectives, T&TH, 11:00 - 12:15, Michah Gottlieb
The course will examine Greek and Jewish perspectives on the question: What makes a life well-lived? Central questions to be explored will include: Does living well require acquiring knowledge and wisdom? What is the place of moral responsibility in the good life? Is the good life, a happy life or does it require sacrificing happiness? Does religion lead to living well or does it hinder it?  What is friendship and how does it contribute to the god life? The course will focus on close readings of primary texts by the following thinkers: Plato, Aristotle, Seneca, Avot, Maimonides, Spinoza, and Hermann Cohen.

CLASS-UA 292 History of Ancient Law, T&TH, 9:30 - 10:45, Andrew Monson
Examines the development of law and legal systems and the relationships of these to the societies that created them, starting with some ancient Near Eastern systems and working down to the Roman period. The main focus is on the fully developed system of Roman law.

CLASS-UA 293 Through the Eyes of Coins: Trade & Wealth in the Ancient World, T 3:30 - 6:00, Peter Van Alfen and Gilles Bransbourg (both from the American Numismatic Society)
Coins are much more than just money. They are windows in the way people organize their politics, their societies, and, of course, their economies. Coins were first struck in the ancient Mediterranean world in the late 7th century BC and rapidly spread throughout Greece coinciding with the revolutionary changes that gave birth to the Greek city-state. Greek and Roman expansions led to increased monetization all across the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds, shaping political structures, fiscal regimes, domestic and international trade. This course begins by looking at archaic Greece before coinage, seeking to understand what money was before coinage, and how trade and wealth were organized. Thereafter, it focuses on the ways in which coinage altered these organizations and structures through Greco-Roman antiquity, leading to entirely new concepts like fiduciarity, exchange rate risk, and inflation. The course will cover the history, methods and theories of numismatics, and will include hands-on experience with ancient coins, while dealing with the impact that coinage had on ancient societies.

CLASS-UA 314, identical to ARTH-UA 850, Greek Sculpture: Prayers in Stone, M&W, 2:00 - 3:15, Joan Connelly
From the “Snake Goddesses” of Minoan Crete, to the marble kouroi of archaic sanctuaries, from the Parthenon sculptures to the Pergamene Altar, the Greeks devoted enormous resources to the sculpting of images.  This course examines sculptural production in Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period, with careful attention to materials, techniques, styles, iconography, authorship, patronage, and settings.  The votive function of images as “pleasing gifts” for the gods, their apotropaic role in protecting tombs and temples, and the commemorative function of sculptured grave markers will be considered within the broader context of signification.  Special topics include: divine images, corporality, athletic statuary, portraiture, and architectural decoration.  Sculptures will be examined within the framework of critical theories of representation, mimesis, aesthetics, and reception, as well as within their broader social, political, and historical contexts.

CLASS-UA 353, identical to ARTH-UA 104, Greek Architecture, M&W 12:30 - 1:45, Anne Kontokosta

Prerequisite: History of Western Art I (ARTH-UA 1), or Ancient Art (ARTH-UA 3), or History of Architecture from Antiquity to the Present (ARTH-UA 601), or a score of 5 on the AP Art History exam.

History of Greek architecture from the archaic through the Hellenistic periods (eighth to first centuries B.C.E.). Provides a chronological survey of the Greek architectural tradition from its Iron Age origins, marked by the construction of the first all-stone temples, to its radical transformation in the late Hellenistic period, most distinctively embodied in the baroque palace architecture reflected in contemporary theatre stage-buildings. The lectures, accompanying images, and readings present the major monuments and building types, as well as such related subjects as city planning and urbanism, building methods, and traditions of architectural patronage.

CLASS-UA 404, identical to RELST-UA 404 Classical Mythology, T&TH, 11:00 - 12:15, Peter Meineck
This course is an examination of the meaning, form and function of Greek and Roman mythology especially its transmission via the literature, art and material culture of the ancient Mediterranean world. We explore the way in which these stories operated in Greek and Roman culture and seek to understand what they were articulating in contemporary social, political, military, economic and artistic life. Consequently, a number of ancient texts will be read in translation and set against iconographic evidence from vase paintings, sculpture and architecture. The course begins by surveying the various ways in which mythology has been catalogued and studied from the ancient mythographers to Freud, Propp. Levi-Strauss, and Burkert  Then ancient texts are used to explore how myth developed throughout the classical period. These will include Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Hesiod’s Work and Days and Theogony, the Homeric hymns to the gods, Greek tragedy and comedy, Virgil’s Aeneid and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. The influence of mythology on the works of Chaucer, Shakespeare and in film will also be discussed. The class meets twice a week and students are expected to complete bi-weekly readings, contribute to in class discussions and a class Blackboard discussion board, sit a mid term and a final complete one essay and attend at least one related theatre performance.

CLASS-UA 700, identical to PHIL-UA 122, Greek Thinkers, T&TH, 11:00 - 12:15, Marko Malink
This is an introduction to central themes in ancient Greek philosophy and their literary background. We will discuss topics such as destiny, freedom, fatalism, contingency, necessity, the nature of human agency, and the nature of human knowledge. Authors to be discussed include Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, and Chrysippus.  This course will help you develop the skills needed to read ancient philosophers profitably on your own. We will spend at least some of our time lingering over fairly short passages, thinking about how to discern more clearly the questions being raised and the answers and arguments being given. We'll also practice standard philosophical skills such as clarifying concepts, noticing distinctions, and analyzing and evaluating arguments.

CLASS-UA 701, identical to COLIT-UA 852, Socrates and His Critics, T&TH, 11:00 - 12:15, Vincent Renzi
Despite having written nothing himself, Socrates is—if not the most influential—certainly one of the most influential intellectual figures in the Western tradition, for it is with Socrates that “philosophy” seems first to move from natural history to an explicit concern for human affairs.  Indeed, so great is the magnitude of this change that we continue to term earlier thinkers “pre-Socratic philosophers.”  His stature is marked again in the name given to a distinctive form of philosophical literature, the Socratic discourse, and an approach to philosophical inquiry and instruction, the Socratic method.  In antiquity, his thought, importantly, inspired Plato, Xenophon, the Stoics, the Skeptics, and the Cynics, beyond those thinkers stretching to influence in Rome and Judea...and four centuries before the presumed time of Jesus, Socrates had already suffered martyrdom for his idiosyncratic political, philosophical, and religious views.  In modernity, his life both fascinates and repels the attention, notably, of Nietzsche; though criticisms of his mode of existence he had already endured in his own time at the hands of the comedian Aristophanes, among others.  Given the state of the evidence, one can look only to the Despite having written nothing himself, Socrates is—if not the most influential—certainly one of the most influential intellectual figures in the Western tradition, for it is with Socrates that “philosophy” seems first to move from natural history to an explicit concern for human affairs.  Indeed, so great is the magnitude of this change that we continue to term earlier thinkers “pre-Socratic philosophers.”  His stature is marked again in the name given to a distinctive form of philosophical literature, the Socratic discourse, and an approach to philosophical inquiry and instruction, the Socratic method.  In antiquity, his thought, importantly, inspired Plato, Xenophon, the Stoics, the Skeptics, and the Cynics, beyond those thinkers stretching to influence in Rome and Judea...and four centuries before the presumed time of Jesus, Socrates had already suffered martyrdom for his idiosyncratic political, philosophical, and religious views.  In modernity, his life both fascinates and repels the attention, notably, of Nietzsche; though criticisms of his mode of existence he had already endured in his own time at the hands of the comedian Aristophanes, among others.  

CLASS-UA 873, Advanced Latin, Petronius’ The Satyricon, T&TH, 2:00 - 3:15, Alessandro Barchiesi
A reading of the Latin text of Petronius, arguably the most original and surprising text of Classical Roman Literature, with the goal of promoting a deeper knowledge of the Latin language and its various levels, and of broadening the vision of Classical antiquity.

CLASS-UA 974, Advanced Greek: Orators, T&TH, 9:30 - 10:45, Laura Viidebaum
Readings of several speeches from the major Attic orators (Lysias, Aeschines, and Demosthenes). Also examines the role of law in Athenian society, procedure in the Athenian courts, and rhetorical education and training.