Culture and Media II:

SAME AS CINE-GT 1403.

Since the millennium, a new field – the ethnography of media – has emerged as an exciting new area of research. While claims about media in people’s lives are made on a daily basis, surprisingly little research has actually attempted to look at how media is part of the naturally occurring lived realities of people’s lives. This course examines the social and political life of media and how it makes a difference in the daily lives of people as a practice – in production, reception, or circulation. It examines cross-culturally how the mass media have become the primary means for the circulation of symbolic forms across time and space and crucial to the constitution of subjectivities, collectivities, and histories in the contemporary world. Topics include the role of media in constituting and contesting national identities, in forging alternative political visions, in transforming religious practice, and in creating subcultures. The types of media forms we will examine range from commercially driven film making to news production, from photographs to Wikipedia, and from indigenous filmmaking to social media posts. We will read about media practices in diverse parts of the world, from India to Israel; Mexico to Hong Kong; South Korea to Nigeria.

In the last decade, a new field?the ethnography of media?has emerged as an exciting new arena of research. While claims about media in people?s lives are made on a daily basis, surprisingly little research has actually attempted to look at how media is part of the naturally occurring lived realities of people?s lives. In the last decade, anthropologists and media scholars interested in film, television, and video have been turning their attention increasingly beyond the text and the empiricist notions of audiences (stereotypically associated with the ethnography of media), to consider, ethnographically, the complex social worlds in which media is produced, circulated, and consumed, at home and elsewhere. This work theorizes media studies from the point of view of cross-cultural ethnographic realities and anthropology from the perspective of new spaces of communication focusing on the social, economic, and political life of media and how it makes a difference in the daily lives of people as a practice, whether in production, reception, or circulation.

Term

Section

Instructor

Schedule

Location

Spring 2019

1
Stephanie Schiavenato
T: 5:00 PM - 7:45 PM 25WV 102
1
Tejaswini Ganti
T: 5:00 PM - 7:45 PM 25WV 102